At the RISC-V Summit in California today, chip designer SiFive revealed its new Performance P650 processor. According to SiFive its latest offering is 50% more powerful than the Performance P550, which was just launched in June.

The 64-bit Performance P650 utilizes the same “thirteen-stage, triple-issue, out-of-order pipeline” as the P550. Instruction-issue width has been increased on the P650, which SiFive has increased performance per clock cycle by 40%.

Maximum clock speed has also been increased, and we learned last month that the Performance P650 peaks at 3.5GHz. SiFive believes the P650 “will enable RISC-V designs for performance-sensitive application processor markets from data center to edge, automotive, mobile and more.”

The Performance P650 can be scaled up to 16 cores. For high-performance applications, SiFive says that multiple chips can be configured to deliver 128-core clusters. It all adds up to a chip that “compares favorably to the Arm Cortex-A77 across a variety of workloads.”

SiFive plans to kick off a preview of the Performance P650 in the first quarter of 2022. “Select lead customers,” will be invited to participate and general availability is slated for the middle of next year.

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  1. RISC-V is getting close. If they could get the performance up to Snapdragon 865 levels in a year or so and get the prices down then I think they could be solid competition to ARM. The biggest issue will be compatibility, much more Linux development will be required before the general public could use these processors.