The UP Element i12 Edge is a rugged, modular computer powered by Intel’s NUC 12 Compute Element – which is basically a computer-on-a-removable module.

It’s the latest offering in the UP line of computers from AAEON, a member of the Asus group that focuses on industrial and embedded platforms.


The system’s Compute Element can be configured with a host of 15-Watt Intel processors: a Celeron 7305, a Core i3-1215U, a Core i5-1235U or a Core i7-1255U. Up to 32 GB DDR5 memory can be installed on the Element, which also features M.2 slots for SSD storage or an AI accelerator.

External displays can be connected via HDMI and DisplayPort and there’s also a USB-C connector that supports DisplayPort 1.4 output. Dual 1/8 jacks accept a microphone input and pump audio out.

Other peripherals can be connected to a pair of USB 2.0 and 3.2 Gen 2 ports. The UP Element i12 Edge also features a dedicated 16-pin header for serial-connected devices.

The Compute Element brings support for WiFi 6 and Bluetooth 5.3 wireless connections. Wired networks can be patched in to two gigabit Ethernet ports or a single 2.5 gigabit port. A lockable power connector ensures that cords won’t fall out or get accidentally yanked out at inopportune moments.

The UP Element i12 Edge works with a variety of operating systems, including Windows 10, Windows IoT, Ubuntu 22.04 LTS and Yocto-created distros. The system isn’t up for sale or pre-order yet, but it is listed as “coming soon.”

via CNX-Software and UP-board.org

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  1. The grey ghost of the Himalayas, the SHEN, the king of the snow-capped mountains and one of the most elusive cats in the world; the Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia) belongs to the large cat family alongside the tiger, lion, leopard and jaguar. But if you are looking for a trademark roar, you will be disappointed as they are the only members in the family who cannot roar. Snow Leopards are thought to inhabit around 2 million sq.km. of area across the Central and South Asian mountains—the Indian Himalayas being one of their most important habitats. They inhabit these precipitous terrains between 500 and 5800m and are well-adapted to the constant freezing temperatures. They prefer rocky mountains and steep ravines.
    snow leopard in Spiti Valley

  2. At work, I am disposing of lots of old computers. Many of these old computers were built like tanks over 10 years ago. But now they are obsolete. Most computers are obsolete in 5 years or less. For example, Microsoft says computers are obsolete if they don’t support TPM 2.0. So how ‘rugged’ does a computer need to be? I think Microsoft’s “Minimum System Requirements” are a bigger threat to computer longivity than the lack of build quality.

    1. When it’s bolted to the side of a CNC lathe, you sort of stop caring about running the latest version of Windows and are more concerned with it running the controller program that was written 5 years ago and has never been updated and the one guy who knew how to set it up correctly left the company already.
      Just make sure it can’t access your CUI.