Disclosure: Some links on this page are monetized by the Skimlinks, Amazon, Rakuten Advertising, and eBay, affiliate programs. All prices are subject to change, and this article only reflects the prices available at time of publication.

The LinkStar-H68K is a tiny computer that’s positioned as a router thanks to its four Ethernet interfaces. But it’s also basically a rugged mini PC that could be used for network-attached storage, digital signage, or other applications.

Available now from Seed Studio for $89 and up, the system is powered by a Rockchip RK3568 processor and ships with Android 11 software pre-installed, but also supports OpenWRT, Ubuntu, and Debian.

The entry-level configuration ships without a wireless card, but you can pay an extra $30 for a version with a MediaTek MT7921 wireless model that adds support for WiFi 6 and Bluetooth 5.2. One thing to note is that the Android and Ubuntu firmware don’t support that wireless card though, so you may need to switch operating systems to use that feature (or bring your own wireless solution).

At the heart of the little computer is Rockchip’s quad-core ARM Cortex-A55 processor with ARM Mali-G52 2EE graphics and a neural processing unit for up to 1 TOPS AI performance. The system has 4GB of LPDDR4X memory and 32GB of eMMC flash storage.

But it also has a microSD card slot for removable storage, as well as a USB 3.0 Type-C port, a USB 3.0 Type-A port and two USB 2.0 Type-A ports that could be used for additional storage.

The LinkStar-H68K is a fanless computer with a metal chassis that measures 80 x 60 x 40mm (3.1″ x 2.4″ x 1.6″). Ports include:

  • 2 x 2.5 Gbps Ethernet
  • 2 x Gigabit Ethernet
  • 1 x HDMI 2.0
  • 1 x 3.5mm audio
  • 1 x USB 3.0 Type-C
  • 1 x USB 3.0 Type-A
  • 2 x USB 2.0 Type-A
  • 1 x 12V/5A DC power input

There’s also an IR receiver on the front, for use with remote controls, and two antenna connectors.

CNX Software notes that the H68K computer/router is also available in China from HNLINK, which is offers additional configuration options including models with 2GB of RAM or a Broadcom AP6256 WiFi 5 module instead of a MediaTek module.

via CNX Software and LinuxGizmos

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

Join the Conversation

4 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    1. opnSense support for ARM processors is almost non existent, so OpenWRT would be a better choice here, especially considering the wireless support.

    1. It’s no different on this than it would be on anything else, though if you’re using this, you’ll need the WiFi card. Use any of the numerous setup guides for OpenWRT. Duplicating their effort here would be redundant as the setup is detailed and those guides have a lot more space to cover it. For example, you could follow instructions here:
      https://cgomesu.com/blog/Mesh-networking-openwrt-batman/