Microsoft is rolling out the latest big update to Windows 11, bringing changes to the Start Menu, taskbar, and Snap Layouts, among other things. There’s also finally support for native tabs in the File Explorer, and the Amazon Appstore and Windows Subsystem for Android is rolling out in more countries (with more Android apps available from Amazon’s store without the need to sideload).

Meanwhile NVIDIA has unveiled its first RTX 40 series desktop graphics cards, Google has confirmed that the Pixel 7 Pro will go up for pre-order on October 6 (the same day the company plans to officially unveil the phone), less than a year after launching a subscription service for its E Ink writing slate, reMarkable is cutting the price of that subscription by more than half, and a 10 minute video review of LG’s unreleased phone with a rollable display has popped up online.

Here’s a roundup of recent tech news from around the web.

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  1. I am assuming that there is some insider knowledge on EVGA’s end that is pushing them into this and they would know best as NVIDIA’s de facto “second party” partner given sales volume. You cannot sustain a PC market with crippling demand and increase prices against that downturn without expecting a fold and NVIDIA is flying directly against those bellweathers. It is unprecedented and it goes against intuition and so it only makes sense for EVGA to not put their necks out when they would get the worst of it GPUs being their mainline of sales especially if they are caught holding a glut of oversupply that they cannot sell. Some are saying NVIDIA is temporarily raising prices as a wait-and-see approach to then drop down once AMD releases their assumed lower priced competitive response. That lacks merit as it is equally unprecedented where this kind of move only puts NVIDIA in bad light as the company who prices higher and only meets the competition if compelled and not of choice. Lastly, these price increases make the RTX 2000 series hikes look mild where these RTX 4000 series one are excruciating. So taking the whole ball of wax into account including declining demand, a reactive response, and severity in scope, NVIDIA is making titanically tragic tactical moves. EVGA was their largest North American partner so for them to back away speaks volumes and is wise to not board this sinking ship. I trust Gamers Nexus more than Igor’s Lab so I am going with the notion that NVIDIA is the poor character here and reading between the lines, EVGA is distancing themselves as NVIDIA’s overpriced RTX 4000 series generation blows up in theirs and their remaining partners’ faces.

  2. I’m starting to think Nvidia is imagining that if you actually need a graphics card, it’s because you’re using it to make money. So it’s okay to charge over twice the price of a console on top of the rest of your computer. After all, you must be running AI research or streaming for an audience (or mining whatever’s being speculated into becoming an etherium replacement), you couldn’t possibly NEED all that power otherwise! Oh and we’re making our own VR Second Life clone because we know lockdowns can come back at any time and that’ll be the closest you get to talking face to face. And we’re going to use your card as part of a distributed computer while you’re not using it in exchange for ????.
    And remember, that absurd price is for the FE cards. AIBs have been so screwed by NVIDIA’s absurd pricing that they just can’t make a profit on them at all, which is why EVGA is quitting making graphics cards entirely.
    And you know what, I bet they’ll still sell out instantly anyway, and once again, AMD is only going to be charging $50 less for cards with no good alternative to CUDA or DLSS and once again, not making enough of them.
    And intel’s cards aren’t even good, to the point that people think they’ll just quit before they even give themselves a chance to improve on what they’ve got.

    Between these prices, inflation, and tax hikes, I’m afraid we might be looking at the end of the line for consumer graphics cards as a whole.

    1. It’s not that NVidia is greedy. Complexity and R&D costs for this hardware and software went into numbers comparable to a GDP of a small country. You do not need bleeding edge hardware to play any modern game, even Cyberpunk runs on integrated GPUs, but people who buy these expensive cards cover expenses for the tech that will go into low end cards you’ll but in a couple years for a few hundred bucks.

    2. EVGA is exiting the market because of its own failures, at least in part, it’s not really hard to understand it: first of all we’d have other companies cutting ties with Nvidia if their conditions were so terribly unreasonable and unworkable; second, if only Nvidia is so bad, why doesn’t EVGA partner with AMD and/or Intel instead of cutting a business that gave them 80% of their revenues and occupied a significant part of its workforce? EVGA appears to be in an unique position. Igor from Igor’s Lab made an interesting article about it, I would suggest to read it, EVGA was quite successful at controlling the narrative and there must certainly be some truth in what they say, but they’re probably omitting something else.

      1. I am assuming that the something more on EVGA’s end and they would know best as NVIDIA’s de facto “second party” partner given sales volume. You cannot sustain a PC market with crippling demand and increase prices against that downturn without expecting a fold and NVIDIA is flying directly against those bellweathers. It is unprecedented and it goes against all forms of logic and so it only makes sense for EVGA to not put their neck’s out when they would get the worst of it it being their mainline of sales especially if they are caught holding a glut of oversupply. Some are saying NVIDIA is temporarily raising prices with a wait and see approach to then drop down once AMD releases their assumed lower priced competitive response. That lacks merit as it is equally unprecedented where this kind of move only puts NVIDIA in bad light as the company who prices higher and only meets the competition if compelled and not of choice. Lastly, these price increases make the RTX 2000 series hikes look mild where these are excruciating. So taking the whole ball of wax into account including declining demand, a reactive response, and severity in scope, NVIDIA is making titanically tragic tactical moves. EVGA was their largest North American partner so for them to back away speaks volumes. I trust Gamers Nexus more than Igor’s Lab so I am going with the notion that NVIDIA is the poor character here and reading between the lines, EVGA is distancing themselves as NVIDIA’s overpriced RTX 4000 series generation blows up in their and their remaining partners’ faces.

        1. I don’t feel like commenting on Nvidia’s prices until AMD will release its own new cards as well, but anyway, are you trusting Gamers Nexus more than Igor’s Lab because it fits more with your bias or because of Igor’s trackrecord? Honestly I’ve watched Steve’s article and he was quite careful about the whole thing, not excluding at all that EVGA might have fucked up something, because after all he was being used by EVGA to push its carefully vetted (the interviews were embargoed) narrative.

      2. Well, sure EVGA is responsible for their own business. But can you blame them? Nvidia has contracts with these partners to control their allowances, unit prices, and market prices.

        For a long time, what differentiated EVGA was their superior design/thermals, and proper customer service. The latter has been impacted by the pandemic, and the former has been decreased with other board partners catching up and Nvidia’s own Founder Edition cards having decent design.

        They can’t function like that on razer thin margins. Going with AMD would simply risk the same thing happening again. Intel is an even worse company to work with. So it’s lucky their graphics department is having issues. The only option they had was to pivot years ago; do a small project with the RX 5700xt, and probably to get acquired by AMD to make great Founders Cards for their RX-6000 series.

        But that’s not what happened, and instead they will carve a tiny niche, and fade away just like HTC did from the phone market.