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Intel is on a mission to get its chips into as many phones and tablets as possible, and the company’s willing to offer its chips to device makers at or below cost to make it happen.

So while Intel reported stronger than expected earnings in its latest financial report and claims to be on track to have its chips power 40 million tablets that ship this year, Intel’s mobile division actually earned 83 percent less revenue in Q2, 2014 than a year earlier.

Bay Trail

 

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4 replies on “Lilbits (7-15-2014): Intel chases the tablet market”

  1. Chromecast disappointment today. Got to my parents’ house and was demoing the cool stuff you can do when I found out that if you leave the device on, it will interfere with over-the-air signals, making broadcast TV virtually unwatchable. After looking into it, this seems to be a fairly widespread problem, and in the UK (where I am) it could severely dent Chromecast sales given the popularity of OTA Freeview.

  2. How nice it is to see the bully boys, Intel and Microsoft so wrong footed and desperately playing catch-up that they are reduced to buying their way back into the market. Indeed, they seem to be willing
    to buy the whole market but the market has outgrown them, no longer needs them and so, sadly for Intel and Microsoft, the market will not be bought.

    1. Buying the market seemed to work for them in the past several times. I guess they’re hoping it’ll work again.

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