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The H96 MAX V58 is a set-top box that ships with software based on Android 12. Designed to let you watch videos, play games, and run other Android apps on a TV, it ships with a remote control and comes with WiFi 6, dual antennas, a Gigabit Ethernet jack and an HDMI 2.0 port with support for 8K video output.

But with a Rockchip RK3588 processor and up to 8GB of RAM and 64GB of storage, you could theoretically use this TV box like a little desktop computer.

The RK3588 chip features four ARM Cortex-A76 CPU cores that can hit speeds up to 2.6 GHz, four Cortex-A55 cores with speeds up to 1.8 GHz, Mali-G610 MP4 graphics, and an AI accelerator with support for up to 6 TOPS of performance.

It also happens to be the same chip that companies are using for Linux-compatible single-board computers and mini PCs like Pine64’s QuartPro64, the Firefly EC-I3588J, and Banana Pi BPI-W3. So there’s a chance that this board might be able to support Linux distributions designed to run on those devices.

Out of the box though, H96 MAX V58 will ship with Android 12, so it’s safest to assume that’s all it will ever run. That still opens the possibility of running a wide range of Android apps, including software that lets you run a Linux desktop environment inside of Android.

The H96 MAX V58 is available from AliExpress and GeekBuying, with prices starting at around $140 for a model with 4GB of LPDDR4 memory and 32GB of eMMC storage. A model with 8GB of RAM and 64GB of storage doesn’t cost much more though – AliExpress sells that configuration for less than $170.

In addition to a single HDMI 2.0 port for video output and a Gigabit Ethernet port for a network connection, the box has a DC port for a 5V/2A power adapter and USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 Type-A ports.

via AndroidPC.es and LinuxGizmos

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    1. It certainly should be. Android provides for Ethernet, Wi-Fi 5, or bluetooth connections to the Internet to be shareable via tethering by means of Wi-Fi (hotspot), USB, or bluetooth.

      1. If it isn’t certified by Netflix, they won’t deliver content to it. That’s a huge issue with loads of the more enticing and powerful STB’s

        1. There’s nothing intrinsic to the device that prevents it from receiving Netflix’ content — you’re confusing capitalist skullduggery for technological deficiency!

          1. He’s incorrect on the point that Netflix won’t deliver content to it, but content delivered to devices that weren’t certified by Netflix is limited to standard definition (480p/576p).

      1. Good point.

        These underdog competitors can really carve a niche for themselves if they embraced the community. But it’s unlikely.

        They’re pretending to ship it with AndroidTV but not disclosing it. So this might have a regular AndroidOS build with a Custom Skin for TV Experience.

        While some “AndroidTV” devices can’t show full-Netflix, and a regular AndroidOS build is usually better. It all comes down to the Widevine L1 status. It’s highly unlikely to come with it, so many Banking Apps and Secure Apps won’t function. Then again you lose those functions with root access anyways, we live in weird times.