Disclosure: Some links on this page are monetized by the Skimlinks, Amazon, Rakuten Advertising, and eBay, affiliate programs, and Liliputing may earn a commission if you make a purchase after clicking on those links. All prices are subject to change, and this article only reflects the prices available at time of publication.

Dell’s new Latitude 3140 is a small laptop with an Intel Alder Lake-N low-power processor and a relatively affordable price tag… if you opt for a model with entry-level specs. Designed for the education market, it’s also available for anyone to buy from Dell.com.

Prices range from $339 to $879, depending on the processor, memory, storage, and whether you opt for a clamshell notebook or a 2-in-1 convertible tablet, among other things.

The entry-level price will get you a notebook with an 11.6 inch, 1366 x 768 pixel non-touch display, an Intel Processor N100 chip, 4GB of LPDDR5x-4800 memory, 64GB of eMMC storage and a 41 Wh battery.

But you can also upgrade to a model with an Intel Processor N200 chip, 8GB of RAM, and up to 256GB of PCIe NVMe solid state storage.

Models with convertible tablet-style designs have a 360-degree hinge and touchscreen display covered by scratch-resistant Dragontrail Pro glass and support for a Dell Active Pen. You can also write on the screen using a No. 2 pencil.

These convertible models also come with a larger 53 Wh battery and has a 5MP world-facing camera as well as the standard 1MP webcam that’s available on all models.

Unfortunately all models of the Dell Latitude 3140 have 1366 x 768 pixel displays. There’s no option for a 1080p or higher resolution display. The laptop also lacks some of the features you’ll usually find on high-priced models, like a backlit keyboard or fingerprint sensor.

But the laptop does support WiFi 6, comes with a 65W AC power adapter, and features a set of ports that includes HDMI 1.4, 3.5mm audio, USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A and USB Type-C.

The Dell Latitude 3140 laptop measures 301 x 205 x 21mm (11.8″ x 8.1″ x 0.8) and weighs 1.35 kg (about 3 pounds), while the Latitude 3140 2-in-1 is the same size, but weighs a little more at 1.42 kg (3.1 pounds).

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

Subscribe to Liliputing via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 9,543 other subscribers

Join the Conversation

12 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. The trick with most business model Dells including these is that if you don’t have a volume discount, you should wait for them to show up on Dell’s outlet site (if in the US) or through outside resellers if outside

    Nicer configurations (8GB) be under $300 on Outlet in maybe 4-6 months.

  2. At least if this matches the last two models, they have a real M2 slot. Dell has service manuals available. The one refurb Dell I got with eMMC had it on an M.2 card (not one of these, but a Wyze 5070 thin client – excellent little Linux servers once upgraded with a bit more ram and a real disk. About US$100 on the outlet site.)

    1. They’ve been making little machines like this for the past several years – Latitude 3190 and then 3120… Both had Atoms or Atom based Pentiums

      N100 is a pretty big speedbump from the prior gen Atoms.

  3. “64GB of eMMC storage” No doubt soldered-down eMMC so you have zero control over your storage. That is a deal killer for me at any price – never mind $339 which is way too high IMO. But it will probably work for government-run “schools” though. They really don’t care about storage management options, and have unlimited taxpayer money to spend.

    1. At least if this matches the last two models, they have a real M2 slot. Dell has service manuals available. The one refurb Dell I got with eMMC had it on an M.2 card (not one of these, but a Wyze 5070 thin client – excellent little Linux servers once upgraded with a bit more ram and a real disk. About US$100 on the outlet site.)

  4. I really thought 2023 would be the year we wouldn’t see a new laptop using a 1366×768 display.

    1. In all fairness, with us slightly older folk, we struggle with high resolution screens on such a small surface with our older eyes. I personally wouldn’t mind 1366×768 on such a small screen. I think it’s a good trade-off.

      Sweet spot for me is 1600×900 on screens 15.6 inches or less.

      1. The trouble with picking a lower resolution as a way of solving that problem is that many websites and applications today are designed for a minimum of 1920×1080. I have an older laptop with a 1440×900 resolution, and those 900 vertical pixels are often a problem with some applications.

        Sometimes I’ll open a Preferences menu in a program, and the vertical height of that window exceeds my resolution, so it sometimes puts the Ok/Cancel buttons below the bottom edge of my screen.

        Another problem is that it makes text more blurry/pixely, which is hard on your eyes when you are reading.

        The best solution for this problem is to pick a higher resolution, and use Windows DPI scaling to increase the size of the elements on the screen. I have bad eyesight, and I use a 2K monitor with 175% scaling in Windows 11, and it’s perfect for me.

      2. justsomeone1, just in case you know you can change screen font size?