There are only a handful of laptops and tablets on the market with AMD Mullins low-power processors, and most feature AMD’s E1 or A4 Micro series processors.

Now Taiwanese device maker BungBungame is showing off one of the first tablets with a more powerful AMD A10 Micro-6700T Mullins processor.

photon2

The BungBungame Photon2 is a Windows tablet with a 10.1 inch, 1920 x 1200 pixel display, 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of storage. It’s designed to work with an optional Bluetooth keyboard cover and a digitizer pen for pressure-sensitive input (in addition to finger input). The tablet has a 30 Wh battery and it’s expected to sell for around $550.

What makes this tablet special is the AMD processor. It’s a 4.5 watt, quad-core processor with a top speed of 2.2 GHz and CPU performance that should be comparable with Intel’s Atom Bay Trail chips. But the AMD processor features Radeon R6 graphics which should offer much better graphics performance than a Bay Trail chip.

Other features of the Photon2 include a micro HDMI port, micro SDXC card slot, 802.11ac WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, and NFC. The tablet has front and rear cameras, and the system measures 10.4″ x 7.2″ x 0.4″ and weighs 1.3 pounds.

via APU Silicon

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98 replies on “BungBungame Photon2 tablet is one of the first with AMD A10 Mullins processor”

  1. It’s a perfect idea! But it should have a USB 3.0 port to plug an external HDD or a Flash Drive.

  2. I’ve owned a few atom based tablets and I’ve found them quite underpowered. I’d happily pay $599 for a 10 inch windows based tablet that I could play some of my favorite pc games on.

  3. Oh niice… now amd put that chip in a tablet people actually wanna buy will you? And btw the specs for this one are quite nice!

  4. waiting for chinese device marker with windows 8.1 bing free edition for 9 inch tablet below than windows 8.1 original price around $120..

  5. Google Nexus 9 is much better deal. It has 9″ higher resolution. Wifi and 4G LTE and Nvidia Tegra K1 processor for only $400.

    1. You know you can just edit your posts and add additional details instead of spamming the site with multiple posts?

      Anyway, this thing has a 10 point multi-touch screen… which is still considered premium when pretty much everything else in the budget range only gets 5 point multi-touch…

      It also apparently comes with a pen and if that’s a WACOM pen then that easily adds over $100 value to the tablet because WACOM is a premium feature and it’s not cheap to add to tablets!

      Along with running Windows instead of Android… and thus puts this in a different category…

      While the AMD Mullins chip appears to have a pretty high unit pricing and isn’t as cheap as ARM or subsidized Intel ATOMs but the GPU performance is better than what Bay Trail offers and makes it pretty competitive with the K1, but unlike the K1 you can actually run a wide range of desktop OS without waiting for special dedicated releases that are customized for the hardware…

      Though, the Bluetooth Keyboard is also included and thus part of the pricing…

      But the pricing could drop later as the December release date is just for a initial limited release of about 60,000 units but later plan to ship up to 5 million units by the second half (I presume they meant next year, this was being translated from a Asian site)…

      While another disparity to the K1 is 4GB is not really an option yet with LP-DDR3 RAM… Between the lack of mass production and not enough devices going to use that capacity yet makes it too much a premium option right now… Thus why the Nexus 9 only offers 2GB of RAM!

      But this Mullins tablet uses DDR3L RAM and that’s plenty common enough right now and this specific pricing is for the 4GB model that also comes with 64GB of storage…

      Mind, there is really a lack of Windows tablets with these specs that don’t go heavily into the Pro Tablet range, like the MS Surface Pro 3 for example… So some may find it acceptable despite courting a little close to Pro tablet pricing… along with those who prefer smaller tablets, as the Pro tablets also tend to be bigger, heavier, etc…

      1. It says Optional Bluetooth keyboard and pen. I dont think that is covered in the 550 price

        1. No, it says included in the original Japanese source web site…

          Really, a WACOM pen needs the digitizer to be built in and thus a pen has to be included if they offer it at all, which they are…

    2. That high resolution screen will do you alot of good when you’re watching youtube videos, browsing the internet, and the 2-3 other things you can do with an Android tablet.

      1. LOL, what cant you do with Android? About the only thing I can think of is virtualization and coding non native languages (you can program Java on Android).

          1. Yes, that’s native. I know all about ndk. I was referring to Microsoft family of languages and objective c.

        1. Does it have a jvm? Can you run flash? Does it run older windows games? Or office? Or photoshop? Or any other software of the massive windows software stack? Well the answer to all those is no. And you don’t actually wrote java it is a java derivate on dalvik. The libraries are similar but javac compiled code won’t ever run on android unless you root it and install a jvm. So basically that is not java with what makes java java… the jvm and the portability of it. It is just a syntax equal and similarly libbed lanuage it could have even be a templating system over c and still look like java.

          1. He was making a reference that there is little you can do with Android, which is not the case. Can you run Office itself, no, but there is OpenOffice and a slew of alternatives that do the same thing. Photoshop, no, but again, there are alternatives (though not as powerful as Photoshop is pretty intense, and even Windows tablets cant do a lot of what photoshop offers. Yes it supports JVMs, everything it runs is in a Davlik which is a JVM, so I dont get your reference. You have obviously never programmed on Android… There are plenty of Java compliers on the market that dont require root. I do it for fun when im in the field. Your whole java argument is nonsense. Every android application is written in Java or C (depending if you are using NDK or not), it then creates a JVM (Davlik) to run the code in. You can program Java all day on Android. Here is a link to the IDE that I use to do it. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.aide.ui&hl=en

          2. yes I know you can write code and publish it for dalvik … problem is the java .class files from javac can not be just loaded into dalvik as the byte code is not compatible. Also many of the libraries are different plus there is aboslutelly no J2EE support or compatibility afaik and that’s what I work, so for me… again android has no use on a device I want to work on. I only now have seen that there is in fact an android port of open office.

          3. Yes, the native code for java wont run on Android, but that doesnt stop IDEs from allowing you to program in Java, and execute it on Android. Its just going to compile it differently. I will give it to you that there are a few libraries out there that will not run on Android, but that number is getting smaller, and if I recall with the implementation of ART, the gap should get even smaller as they move closer to actual JVM. For the most part though, you can program just about anything in Java and run it on Android (on the device itself, not in Eclipse/Netbeens)

          4. Yeah i know i played around with it but was quickly dissapointed that i couldn’t move my binaries and needed to recompile everything. Plus i had some binaries that i only had as binaries. Also as i said i work mostly j2ee so android was mostly just a curiosity of mine. Btw can you use maven in conjunction with this compiler? I’m basically helpless without it when coding large systems.

          5. Unfortunately no, though I’m sure it could be found elsewhere, and if not it couldn’t be too hard to make

  6. This AMD Tablet is only wifi … It doesn’t have cellular data 4G LTE. for $550. is totally wrong. I might buy for $300. or less.

      1. What good is 64 bit with 4gigs of ram really going to do you? That processor is the x86 equivalent of a K1, just slower… Sure, you can run some of the 64b only programs, but thats about it. Your not going to be processing 4GB of data on that processor. So, you can have a bunch of programs open sure, but they cant all be doing things, the CPU wont handle it. Page files would be just as efficient in this case, as long as the NAND is fast enough.

        1. well… I don’t call it a success… I call it a nice start… after all it is the first AMD powered tablet afaik :D. For what I’m working I need loads of ram and a just decent cpu. But I really do need 64bit and windows 🙂 So for me it is a good buy. But you’re right not for everybody

        2. A bunch of programs open with 4-GB RAM is also very meaningful for those CPU-static but RAM-consuming programs/works, including Word, PowerPoint…

          Specifically, some programming IDEs, Visual Studio, Eclipse, MATLAB, can also be CPU-static but RAM-consuming programs. In fact, I won’t use a 2-in-1 tablet to run mass computing programs. I just like to use tablet everywhere to develop programs but run them on strong computing personal computers. So, the develop work is just CPU-static but RAM-consuming.

          1. I just checked my eclipse is currently using 2.4gb… but i do have 40+ linked projects and tons of plugins… i also keep it on auto build and autodeploy (i know i’m an a$$ but hey i have 8gb ram on this why not use it)

  7. Google Nexus 9 9″ screen with LTE and Nvidia Tegra K1 $400. better deal… lots better !!

    1. Find me a 4gb 4cores x86 64 bit and a very powerfull gpu with 64gb ssd and 2k screen and winows8 for less…. good luck

  8. The screen bezel is quite big, I hope the digitizer is a Wacom, and I’ll wait a bit till we know what to expect from this CPU. The raw processing power should be good, but I don’t know about heat or throttling. I hope it’s passively cooled.

      1. TDP of 4.5 is generous. The throttling on this thing is ridiculous according Anandtech. It throttled to half performance really fast.

  9. Will this have a wireless charging option? Or do you have to use the BungBungame hole?

    1. how is that too big? there are plenty of 1080 to 1200 resolution 10 inch screens out there. Lenovo even makes an 8″ tablet with a 1920×1080 resolution.

      1. For Windows desktop, FHD and higher on a screen smaller than 11.6″ can easily become hard to use because not everything will scale properly on the desktop…

        Mind, the desktop requires a level of precision to use but if not everything is at a appropriate scale then you run into issues like being unable to easily click what you want to click… Especially, with the much less accurate than a mouse capacitive touch screen and stubby fingers while using it as a tablet…

        This is not to be confused with UI optimized for touch, like Android, iOS, etc that are mostly graphically based and scale well regardless of resolution…

        So for small screens HD resolution becomes a better compromise between easy usability and image clarity… at least until MS better optimizes the desktop side… but it’s not easy because it’s not just up to them, as all the desktop apps, websites, etc. also have to support proper scaling and that’s really the biggest hurdle and why they haven’t done a better job already…

        While, it’s also a matter of performance and power efficiency… running a higher resolution increases the average work load and that can both strain performance, and cause a loss of battery life… and battery life is pretty important in mobile range devices…

        1. This device has a digitizer, it helps a lot for desktop, also the desktop can be scaled.
          Windows store apps are all finger friendly, windows tablets can be used connected to a monitor so no scaling issues. For fun or reading you have metro apps and also a browser with plugins. iOS can’t do this.

          1. Yes, the digitizer does help… Though, it also depends how well optimized it is and whether the drivers for the tablet are well developed or not… it’s unfortunately rare for non-big name companies don’t usually provide a good set up for the pen…

            So can run into issues like pressure sensitivity not working, not able to use the pen all the way to the edge of the screen, etc.

            Meaning, we’ll have to wait for user reviews before being sure the pen adds as much as it can or not…

            While scaling is improved and many things can be adjusted but not everything scales well and a lot depends on the programs/apps developers and website designers as to whether the scaling can be taken advantage of or not…

            Also, a lot of people don’t optimize their system and that means how the system comes configured is important and determines whether it’ll be all that usable or not… for out of box usage…

            There is little doubt you can just plug it in to a larger monitor, however… It’s just a question of how well it can be used as a tablet…

            The BT KB helps but it’s not a dock and makes things like lap usage difficult… So, you’ll be mostly either working on a table or using it as a tablet and that usage will determine if it’s a good design or not… but is one of the reasons to emphasize the pen, provided it’s well optimized for the system…

          2. … So, you’ll be mostly either working on a table or using it as a tablet
            that’s exactly what I mean, it’s the value of windows and that’s how I use mine, another cool thing of the digitizer is note taking, I don’t use paper at all, have everything in OneNote.
            The main problem with Windows is hardware, IMHO Surface is the best thing that MS has done so far, If they will launch a mini 8 or 8.9″ other OEMs can’t compete, the closest one is the thinkpad 10 but it’s very expensive and battery life reports are pretty bad.
            Just out of curiosity which tablet do U use Air?

          3. I’m not too particular about the devices I use, but I usually use either Windows or Android devices… Never really cared for the iOS locked down ecosystem… Especially, early on when you couldn’t even set it up, or recover from a crash, without a PC…

            As for the Surface, keep in mind MS is still making the RT version and that has both limited desktop and no pen!

            Surface Pro 3 is pretty good, much better than the first two, but still a bit pricey for most people looking for something more basic for day to day usage and not work… Hopefully we’ll see a Core M version soon for a fan less design… And yeah, MS is still considering the Surface Mini but will probably wait for Windows 10 and next gen Intel Atom before they release it…

  10. This CPU is MUCH more powerful than the Bay Trail Atoms. It scores a Passmark score of 3700 (the Atom Z3740 scores around 1000). This CPU is just a notch faster than the i5-4310U.

        1. Might be some confusion when people are looking for benchmarks… specifically between the 4.5W TDP A10 Micro-6700T and the higher end 45W TDP A10-6700T…

          The later gets a Passmark score of 3799, in line with what GR quoted… So we basically got side tracked with the similar model numbers…

          Re-looking around, I can’t find any postings for the Passmark score for the Mullins but Anandtech and Tom’s Hardware have other benchmarks for comparison…

          https://www.anandtech.com/show/7974/amd-beema-mullins-architecture-a10-micro-6700t-performance-preview/3

          https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-tablet-processor,3813-4.html

      1. Another idiot not making a difference between base and boost clock… “downclocked” lol. Look at discovery tablets reviews before posting such rubish about these chips…

    1. No, first you’re comparing to a relatively low end ATOM that’s much lower powered than the Mullins that’s a power hog in comparison… Also, that Passmark score was taken from a Mullins running with Turbo Speed of 3.5GHz, which is much higher than the 2.4GHz max Burst Speed for the ATOM… While this version has to be clocked down to be usable in such a small tablet and not generate too much heat, and use up too much power…

      For the upper end the J1900 Celeron is also a Bay Trail ATOM, for example, and here’s a link that compares in more fair benchmarks…

      https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-tablet-processor,3813-4.html

      But again, that’s with the Mullins going full out and this tablet won’t be doing that…

      Besides, the price you’re paying for it is quite different as well… Bay Trail ATOMs, even the Celeron Range barely go much higher than $82 and less than $37 on the low end, not counting the subsidized pricing that pushes it even lower…

      While, the same report for the Passmark score for the Mullins puts a list price of $207.41? USD on it, which kinda explains why a 10″ tablet can be priced $550,… While a similar Z3740 tablet like the Asus Transformer Book T100 can be had for about $200 less, not counting discounts and sales that often push it below $300 and even occasionally down to about $200…

      1. I cant verify most of what you are saying but the last bit about the $200+ list price is incorrect. also this tablet most like likely ships with non-emmc flash storage [read mcie ssd] which would driver up prices, not to mention converting from yen.

        1. You’re right on the pricing, looks like I was looking at Price change instead of unit pricing…

          https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=AMD+A10-6700T+APU

          The SoC is also tuned to a much lower clock speed and that usually means a lower pricing for the SoC…

          Though, the 1.2GHz is just its sustained clock speed and it’s suppose to still support Turbo Core to 2.2GHz… Even if it’s only for one core at a time as is the traditional norm for AMD’s Turbo Core technology…

          Anyway, there are other reasons for the pricing… 4GB of RAM is still a lot for a non-pro tablet… the touch screen is 10 point instead of the usual 5 point and may be using a WACOM digitizer because it comes with a 1024 pressure sensitive Pen, and the BT KB comes included as well…

          Though, it is still likely that the AMD SoC costs more than a Intel ATOM SoC, since AMD isn’t subsidizing their SoCs like Intel is and isn’t directly competing with ARM like Intel is… but $18-$19 per unit is still pretty affordable… assuming that link is showing accurate information…

          There may also be a quantity limitation factor to the pricing because initial release in December is only for 60,000 units and they won’t ship the 5 million they plan to ship until later… Along with possible differences in currency conversion and things like Vat but they do plan to sell it on Amazon… and pricing tends to go down once the product becomes common enough to be widely available…

          For the specs, though, I doubt it be a lot cheaper… Even a Asus Transformer T200 with cheaper parts still has a starting price of $499 for the Z3795, 4GB of RAM, 64GB eMMC, and 64bit W8.1 model… and that’s still a subsidized device…

      2. That is utter bs… the atom not even the z3770 can beat this chip. The atom chip is rated sdp of 2w which is to say sht about actual tdp. Amd’s chip us rated 2.8w sdp so from what we know about intels sdp the 2 chips are probably at same tdp and comparable power draws.

        This mullins has 2.2 ghz boost clock and it is the maximum of the mullins range. What you see as 3.5 ghz are beema chips rated 15 watt. So stop being an idiot and read before you troll.

        Also amd obtains those numbers on 28nm while intel can’t beat it on 22nm… just a small additional factoid.

        Look at the actual benches on mullins done on the discovery tablets. Geez you intel fangirls are getting more idiotic by the minute.

        1. Not trolling, you might want to look up what trolling actually means, but I will admit I did get the models confused but that’s only because GR confused the matter by claiming the Passmark score of 3700 and there appears to be no Passmark scores available for the actual correct model yet and thus the wrong model shows up in any search but no… I wasn’t trying to say there wasn’t any advantage but you’re wrong to think it’s overly significant…

          Yes, point of fact, the Mullins Puma+ cores are a bit faster than the Intel Silvermont cores but they can’t fully take advantage of that in this chip because it still runs hotter and fan-less puts too much a limit on the SoC, even with the greater range the new skin temp sensor system allows.

          The advantage is also limited because, unlike Intel, AMD has no intentions of directly competing with ARM and thus this chip isn’t designed to be able to scale so low that you could use it in a Smart Phone or even mid size tablets…

          So, the advantage is small enough that it mainly only matters in benchmarks but real world usage won’t see enough of a difference to justify it for most people… especially, if you can get cheaper devices with the other…

          Sure, the GPU advantage is pretty good and compares to the same GPU advantage Kabini offered but that alone doesn’t affect the choices for most people and how they use these mobile range devices most of the time…

          Also, let’s not exaggerate about how this compares to Intel 22nm Bay Trail as they are neither optimized the same nor are they meant for exactly the same markets… Specifically, you won’t see the Puma+ in a Internet of Things device, Smart Phone SoC, or even mid size mobile tablets… While the Intel Silvermont core is in all of the above and tries to compete with ARM devices in the same range… So, don’t confuse overlap with really being focused on the same things…

          While AMD may still be on 28nm and they did significantly improve since Brazos, but they’re still a long way from AMD’s higher end chip performance and still barely can go into mobile range devices, this 10″ device may be the smallest you see it used… The AMD Discover Tablet was 11.6″ and likely the more ideal size for this SoC to be used and not worry about too much thermal throttling… and they have the advantage of having been able to focus on performance instead of the next FAB advance, unlike Intel has been doing with focusing on both…

          Along with having over a year difference in release time to their advantage but the downside to that is it means they’re closer to when Intel will release their next update and that could very well close the small advantage they have on performance now… and it doesn’t help that AMD depend on the same manufacturers as ARM for whenever they can take advantage of the next FAB advance as Intel still maintains a lead over them… and AMD has had to deal with delays because of those other FABs…

          And you can’t count on the architecture advantage to last either because Intel is going to make a fairly significant advance when they introduce the Goldmont architecture in just about a year from now…

          There’s also the question of whether AMD will continue to even develop their own low end x86 SoCs when it seems they may be moving to ARM to support that product range instead and change focus to their GPU advantage and GPU computing options to compete…

          So there is a question about long term investment right now as well… especially, if it turns out more profitable for AMD to change focus…

          Anyway, what is clear… It’s a low end device with about half the performance of a Trinity and the price point borders on the premium side normally reserved for business class devices, along with still having the question of how good the battery life will be if the device doesn’t support mobile features like Always Connected Standby and other extreme power sipping states…

          Really, it’s more than just having the approximate TDP of a mobile device but it also needs to be able to power sip like a mobile device when it’s not being used for much as well for it to truly get mobile like battery life…

          Support for Android and Linux in general could also be better… making a deal with the makers of Bluestacks is hardly the same as being able to boot and run the Android OS, for example… but is another example of AMD not trying to directly compete with the ARM market…

          1. Ok that was a long read. Fact of the matter is mullins is now competing with silvermont and beating it at all performance metrics. We’ll see about battery life. It is true mullins doesn’t have the ultra deep power stages but those are said to come with nolan, the next iteration. We’ll see about that. Also they stated that they will have x86&arm in parallel for next gen so amur/nolan.

            Also intel has a fabrication lead at the moment but the gap is closing so fast intel will soon be in a world of hurt if samsung starts volume production on 14nm in 2015. Then the effective gap will have shrunk to a few months and by the looks of it samsung is determined to catch up with intel and give it a run for its money. I fully expect the 10nm race to be won by samsung/glofo or at least to be a very tight race. Even with 14nm it still is not clear if intel won’t delay broadwell/skylake yet again and push it further back in 2015 and make the gap even smaller.

          2. Intel is already pushing out Core M on the 14nm FAB… So it’s unlikely they’ll have any additional delays… They’re just focusing on mobile heavily to the point we’ll likely won’t see the desktop Broadwell until early 2016… But Intel does have a history of generally having shorter delays than the other manufacturers…

            Like the early 28nm FAB productions were bad enough that AMD had to cancel a few products they originally had planned and wound up nearly a year behind their original planned timeline schedule…

            Many of the ARM manufacturers are also relying on things like government subsidizing them that won’t continue forever and each FAB advance is progressively more expensive to developer and set up than the last…

            Samsung and Global Foundries have already started teaming up in response to get to 14nm and the pressure will only increase going forward…

            While, the race isn’t just about FAB size but also the technologies that go into the FAB… Advances like FinFets won’t even go into full effect for ARM FABs until they hit the 16/14nm range…

            The upcoming 20/16nm half nodes won’t give the full usual advance improvements, thus the rush to get to 14nm, and not all of them may actually reach the 14nm node…and there’s a question of whether skipping a node won’t cause a problem later…

            While Intel still holds the at least two FAB advance lead for when they introduce a new technology to the time the others introduce the same at a later FAB advance… Like Intel introducing their Tri-Gate transistors at 22nm but the others waiting till 14nm before also introducing FinFets… along with that being another reason they’re trying to rush it in…

            So it does appear Intel has the long term progress better secured with planned steady advances to 14nm, then 10nm, and then 7nm… but we’ll see… lots can still happen in the next few years… and further alliances like Samsung and GF are using can change the dynamics going forward…

            But Intel is also accelerating their architecture advancement as well… The Braswell/Cherry Trail immediately moves the ATOM to their latest GPU and the same will happen again when Goldmont architecture gets released… So, in less than two years they’ll go from the present Bay Trail Gen 7 GPU to Gen 9…

            Given their GPU history, it is doubtful they’ll ever pull ahead but all they really need to do is close the gap enough to make it no longer a significant factor…

            While competing with ARM also means competing in pricing and Intel is also making more changes going forward that will significant reduces costs for both them and the OEMs making the devices…

            Goldmont is specifically a scalable and customizable architecture, just like ARM offers and being able to run a wider range of software than ARM supports could very likely give them an advantage regardless of how the FAB works out… and even a hybrid solution from AMD is likely to sacrifice such support…

            But that too is a we’ll see as it also depends on the state of the PC market in the next few years as what happens in the mobile may or may not really matter to AMD, especially if they gain market share in other markets like the server market…

          3. Fact still remains that while intel will start shipping 14nm q1/2015 samsung might do the same q3. Which effectivelly means a 6 months fab advantage intel has. Samsung looks intent on doing to intel what it did to apple, steal their lunch. And they can throw money at it and have far better market reach in emerging markets then intel has so it will be easy to recover costs since 14nm will be primarilly for mobile and by the time intel will have desktop 14nm samsung may already be ahead. Plus intels density was always worse then that of the fabs so same size same node chips might actually have 20% more transistors on samsungs/tsmc side while being nearly as efficient. This means that while intel will be able to stick 1bn transistors into a mobile chip everybody else will stick 1.2. Just look at the behemoths just launched on 20nm, the a8x is 3bn plus heavy. As a refference kaveri is only 2.4 transistors heavy and the 8 core haswell is 2.2bn heavy. So basically amd using same process apple uses now should be able to build a ps4 like apu inside a phone power envelope more or less… which is scary by any standard. We’ll see if broadwell’s 14nm is denser but i strongly suspect it ain’t.

          4. Sorry, but your using a few misconceptions…

            1) Intel already has a bigger lead because they are already producing and shipping 14nm with the Core M and that means by the time the Braswell/Cherry Trail gets released that Intel would already have gone through the normal burn in period as the new FAB gets all the final bugs worked out and can start ramping up mass productions much faster… and that easily saves them 6 months to a year on the production cycle…

            2) Intel has a advantage because their FABs are under utilized and thus can easily ramp up production more than double if demand goes up but many ARM FABs are barely meeting demand already… AMD and others have already started ordering from multiple manufacturers because of this…

            3) Transistor count is misleading as how they count isn’t the same and performance depends more on the architecture… Besides, aside from servers ARM still has a long time before they can really take advantage of 64bit to scale both performance and usage range… At least outside of the server market…

            4) ARM does presently have the advantage in numbers and market momentum in the mobile market but that can still change and Intel still has both the financing capital and time needed…

            PC market, for example, had finally started improving and Intel is still doing well outside the mobile market… While I wouldn’t underestimate them as they have shown time and time again that they can exceed expectations, especially when competition ramps up and regardless of how it plays out competition is ultimately good for the consumers…

    2. You should also look at the anandtech review of the discovery tablet. The thing puts off a ton of heat, and causes it to throttle really hard. Yeah, at first it will run amazing, but if you keep running intense operations on it, you will quickly see your performance fall off (by over half).

        1. Yeah, but not the k1 which is what most people are comparing it to. And anandtech pointed out that it happens much faster with Mullins

          1. This was my biggest complaint with the Z3000 Atom chips. I found that the Dell Venue 8 Pro (Z3740D) would almost never turbo when I was doing anything heavy.

            I wouldn’t say the K1 is the best comparison to the AMD APU. It is clear the APU is trying to compete with the Intel Bay Trail chips.

          2. I didn’t notice anything with the turbo with mine. It seemed to perform fine. I wasn’t really doing anything intense on it outside of Dreamweaver. I ended up trading it for a nvidia shield. Comparing Mullins to that isn’t really fair, as that processor is old as hell. But the argument was you could get a comparable tablet for a lot cheaper and I feel the venue fits the bill

          3. K1 and this chips are 2 distinct markets. K1 is android only whereas this can run windows or x86 android… big diff since k1 can’t run full windows anything.

          4. They are both mobile SoCs though. Its like saying you cant compare Core M with K1 or A8X. Sure they are different architectures, but they are still mobile.

          5. Well yeah but they don’t directly compete that is what i meant. If you want a windows tablet you’re looking at totally different animals tgen if you want an android same as ios. You can compare performance but since android and ios shops look prettymuch the same the windows scene is a bit different because of the desktop softwares that mostly will run happily on such a device… even some older 3d games

          6. My biggest question does it run crysis?? Somebody should at least try to lol

          7. Well yeah no doubt about it but as a buyer you either buy an android an ios or windows. And the guys buying windows are usually radically different from the ones buying android or ios. While ios and android offer similar breadth in apis and most apis and games are pirted on both not so on windows… but windows has the finest productivity apis around plus it runs flash and java without restrictions… which can not be said about android or ios.

      1. If you run intense things on it you could use a colling system such as the laptop external coolers coupled with the docking port (which i hope it has) this could be a ultra light desktop that could run indefinite on burst… i however am waiting for the nolan chips to make the move to ultralight destop 🙂

  11. Why is it so expensive, $550, seriously ? There must be at least 5 competitors with similar specs, who get the job done for $200-$250. Are they clueless, or just desperate ?

    1. Do these $200-250 tablets REALLY get the job done? Do they have 4gb of ram? Do they have a GPU which will actually play games? Do they have support for a 64 bit OS?

      Because if the devices you have in mind are the Dell Venue 8 Pro, or the Asus T100, the answer to all those questions is “hell no”

      1. $200-250… Agreed… they won’t give you full 64bit support… since budget specs are still too low to fully support 64bit becoming the default yet… at least for now, it’s more likely when the Braswell update rolls out next year and Intel implements all the changes they’ve been planning to help reduce costs for OEMs…

        So, for now… you’d have to pay around $500 or higher for a system that offers those kind of specs…

        They are available, though, like the Asus Transformer T200 now offers a model with Z3795, 4GB of RAM, 64GB eMMC, and running 64bit W8.1 for $499…

          1. They both come with a Keyboard, but while the T200 had lower spec screen, the T200 is also larger, which adds cost for the larger amount of materials used to make it, and also has to pay a higher premium for the 4GB LP-DDR3 RAM… Thus why the pricing is still close… But the point is there are trade offs for certain specs besides just what SoC is being used…

          2. I took “optional keyboard cover” to mean that you have to pay extra for the keyboard, as is the case with some of the Android Asus Transformers.

          3. I followed the links to the original Japanese source web site… There it states it’s included…

          4. The article states that the keyboard and pen are optional, which I believe means it doesnt come with them at 550

      2. You should wait about 30-60 days for the Z3775/85 (64-bit) offerings, from Chinese manufacturers.

  12. This product has two (but seriously huge) negative things going for it dooming it to failure 1) The manufacturers name. No one in North America would buy this with a straight face and without looking around to see if anyone was watching them (and not even at a Walmart). 2) It’s running Windows 8.1. Do I still need to explain this disaster (except to the very few fanboys out there)? With Windows 10 on the horizon and no guarantees that these devices will be able to be upgraded to Windows 10, you’re going to be stuck with something that you can not resell. Don’t waste your money on anything Windows 8.1 unless you want a fancy (and expensive) cutting board.

    1. Everything that runs Win8.1 can run and be upgraded to Win10.

      Now wether you’ll be able to (legally) upgrade for free is another matter entirely.

      1. I’d like to see your source that explicitly says “All current windows 8.1 devices will be able to run Windows 10 when it is released to the public”. Show me that and I’ll retract my statement with credits to you. As far as free vs paid upgrade goes, that’s not as important to me.

        1. I don’t think a source is needed. If you don’t believe that a Windows-powered x86 device can have a different OS installed on it, you need to learn a few things about computers.

          1. LOL, good one Grant. Glad to see you’re back to wearing mens clothing again. Say, this must be your first rodeo with Microsoft products eh? Clearly you haven’t been burnt by buying previous iterations of their shit only to find out that they’re not going to receive updates eh? Lucky you. I can’t wait to hear you bleet like a little whiny schoolgirl if this happens to your shiny new BungBungame tablet.

        2. Back when they were still calling it Windows 9 a President of Microsoft’s Indonesia branch, a Andreas Diantoro, confirmed that all Windows 8 systems will be able to easily install the update after downloading it from MS… essentially modeling the update like a OSX OS update in which you just download and upgrade, free of charge… at least as long as you’re updating from a Windows 8 system…

          Really, there’s no reason why Windows 10 won’t run on existing hardware… especially as they’re pushing Windows 10 to be the first Universal OS or at least a good start to one… So will have to support a very wide range of hardware…

          Besides, people are already running the Technical Preview on just about everything already…

          1. Hello dipshit, if/when Microsoft drops support for their older products like they’ve done in the past, you’re fucked. Lucky you that this hasn’t happened to you before but I can’t wait to hear from you if/when it does happen to you.

          2. You remind me of my Grandfather, swearing at Microsoft for abandoning support for XP. Learn a thing or two and install install your own OS. This isn’t iOS, this is a fucking computer.

      2. I would normally agree with you, but I have a very strong feeling that all of the Atom Bay Trail tablets that were delivered with only a 32-bit UEFI will probably not be upgradable. If Microsoft has any sense, they will support only 64-bit UEFI, and Legacy BIOS booting.

        1. Well, so far they’re supporting both 32bit and 64bit UEFI… Lots of people using the Technical Preview on existing devices!

          And it’s unlikely they’ll stop support for 32bit when they already showed a info chart showing they want Windows 10 to run on everything from Internet of Thing devices on up to desktops… For the low end it’s unlikely they’ll be 64bit only when most won’t need 4GB and more RAM… and thus they still need to support a range for the 32bit market…

          Mind, 64bit also means more bloated code and more resource requirements that will make it harder to run on minimalistic devices…

          While it’s mainly only better for those who want to run 3rd party OS that these devices run only 64bit UEFI…

          Besides, it’s not really up to MS but the device makers as MS only sells them the software and tools but the device makers are the ones who decide how the device is set up…

    2. I don’t think you will ever see this outside of Taiwan and why the hell wouldn’t you be able to upgrade this to Windows 10? Seriously, give me 1 freaking reason why you can’t upgrade the OS on a x86 system?

      1. It probably doesn’t matter. I doubt many people who either can’t or are unwilling to figure out Win 8.1 will be able to use Win 10 either.

        But I wouldn’t assume this device could upgrade. Maybe it won’t have enough free space when it’s time to upgrade, or maybe a driver will be missing. I had two nearly identical HP Slimlines and one of them wouldn’t upgrade to Win7, but it did upgrade to Win8.

    3. I guess you are being sarcastic, even cheap windows tablets are more productive that iPads, before getting the PRO 3 was using my ThinkPad 8 as daily device, I was using connected to a 21″ inches monitor for excel and VS Express. This one with 4gb sounds really interesting

  13. well seeing as the Core-M70 has very Atom level performance levels (according the daniel rubino on windows central) i wonder what does better in these form factors, the Core M70 or the A10 6700T , this Could be AMDs foot hold to getting on top

    1. Not likely, Intel’s tablet share is subsidized heavily. Intel didn’t mind letting AMD have a design win with a company named BungBungGame is the only reason this tablet exists.

  14. Is it too hard for all these Windows OEMs to use a decent wallpaper for a new product ?

  15. I was never one for the BungBungame myself, but hey whatever floats ’em.
    Yeah it was me. I went there.

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