The AYN Odin is an Android-powered handheld game console with a 6 inch display, built-in game controllers, Qualcomm and MediaTek processor options, and prices that currently range from $199 for an entry-level Odin Lite to $328 for an Odin Pro with maxed-out specs.

After going up for pre-order last year through a crowdfunding campaign, the Odin began shipping to backers earlier this year and eventually went up for pre-order from AYN’s website as well. Now the company says it’s caught up on pre-orders, which means that anyone who orders an Odin handheld now should receive their order relatively quickly.

According to the AYN website, the lead time for AYN Odin units is 3-5 working days, but you should probably expect it to take a few weeks for your order to be processed and shipped to your door.

It’s also worth noting that the update if for AYN Odin Base and Pro units, which currently have starting prices of $239 and $287, respectively. The $199 AYN Odin Lite is “sold out” at the AYN store, although you can still order one through Indiegogo InDemand for $228 and up. Just don’t expect it to ship as quickly as the Base or Pro models.

All of AYN’s Odin-branded handhelds feature 6 inch, 1080p displays, fans for active cooling, action buttons, a D-pad, analog sticks, and analog trigger buttons plus Android-based software. But the Base and Pro models have Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 processors while the Lite has a MediaTek Dimensity 900 chip.

While the Qualcomm processor offers better gaming performance, it’s an older chip. And that explains why the Lite actually has a few advantages (beside the lower price tag), including support for WiFi 6, Bluetooth 5.2, and Android 11.

Here’s a run-down of key specs for each model:

Odin ProOdinOdin Lite
Display5.98 inches
1920 x 1080 pixels
369 ppi
Touchscreen
IPS LCD
Dragontrail Glass
ProcessorQualcomm Snapdragon 845MediaTek Dimensity D900
RAM8GB
LPDDR4x
4GB
LPDDR4x
4GB
LPDDR4x
Storage128GB or 256GB
microSD card reader
64GB
microSD card reader
64GXB UFS 2.1
microSD card reader
PortsUSB 3.1 Type-C
mini HDMI
3.5mm audio
microSD card reader
AudioQualcomm Aqstic Audio Codec
2 x 1W speakers
2 x 1W speakers
WirelessWiFi 5
Bluetooth 5.0
WiFi 6
Bluetooth 5.2
Battery & charging6,600 mAh
Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0 / 4.0 / 4.0+
6,600 mAh
fast charging
OSAndroid 10Android 11
Dimensions224 x 95 x 15mm
Price$287 – $328 (current)
$324 – $365 (list)
$239 (current)
$279 (list)
$199 (current)
$237 (list)

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5 Comments

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  1. @Brad. In the chart it looks like you swapped the header for Odin and Odin Pro.

    For instance if you read the chart it says the Odin Pro has 4GB of Ram, while the Odin has 8GB of Ram and so on

  2. I found this interesting from a technological standpoint, a friend of mine had the pro version and installed Windows on it. It was my first time seeing proper Windows on ARM and running x86 games such as Skyrim and Tomb Raider 2016. It also showcased the power of the Adreno GPU. I found this important because comparing x86 and ARM CPUs was always a bit apples to oranges, and hard to grasp, but when you see Tomb Raider running this well on a 4-5 year old mobile CPU it finally puts into context all the benchmarks, it bridges the gap, it’s a Rosetta Stone for ARM-to-x86 benchmarks. I don’t need this device, but I consider it an important piece of tech for this reason. And because of the lack of this capability I think the Lite with the MT SoC is a different category without the merits of the other two Odins.

  3. It’s good, but not great.
    There’s some nitpicky things about this.

    For one, I would have a much bigger discrepancy between the Lite and Pro in both specs and price. Such as the Odin Pro having 8GB/128GB and the QSD 870 chipset instead for USD $350 Shipped. While the Lite gets a 4GB/64GB and the D820 chipset for USD $200 shipped.

    Also I would make it more ergonomic. That means putting front-firing stereo loudspeakers where the logo/start buttons are. Moving the Right-Joystick up, and the Action Buttons down. Then putting the Start/Select buttons as -/+ buttons diagonally between the Joystick/D-Pad and Joystick/Action Buttons.

    Why?
    Because it is easy to do 2D Games, so there will be lots of competition there. We instead want to differentiate by prioritising the 3D comfort and 3D emulation/gaming capabilities. That also means having better sound experience too.

    Lastly I would have to ask the question about size. Do we want these to be pocketable? That means having a 4.3-4.8 inch (16:9) screen, or maximum dimensions of roughly 180x80x15mm, weighing 200 grams, and most likely just Passively Cooled.

    Or do we want these to be indoors use like an iPad, that prioritises screen size/comfort, but fits inside a backpack like a Laptop? While that means having a 7.0-9.0 inch (16:10) screen, or maximum dimensions of roughly 300x120x30mm, weighing 600 grams, and most likely Actively Cooled.

    I feel like the former (pocketable/oudoor) category fits well for ARM devices that can do emulation between the PS1 and upto PS Vita (with Android Gaming). While the latter (backpack/indoor) category fits well for x86 devices that can do emulation between the Xbox 360 and upto PS4 (with Windows Gaming).

    1. Lastly I would have to ask the question about size. Do we want these for outdoor use, or for indoor use?

      As it is, it sits in a weird unoptimised position. It’s way too large to slip into a pocket, but using a backpack to lug around, or using it indoors around the house… well you kind of regret not having a bigger screen. A screen size between 5.0 – 7.0 inches is basically compromised, and I can’t quite recommend it from a design position. Most of the Handheld Devices in the past 2 Years have targeted this weird compromising spot, mostly because it’s just easier for the manufacturers to build rather than optimising for their customers.

      To elaborate, “outdoor use” means making it pocketable. That means having a 4.3-4.8 inch (16:9) screen, or maximum dimensions of roughly 180x80x15mm, weighing 200 grams, and most likely just Passively Cooled.

      Whereas “indoor use” means prioritising the screen size and comfort like an iPad, while travel means fitting it inside a backpack like a Laptop? That means having a 7.0-9.0 inch (16:10) screen, or maximum dimensions of roughly 300x120x30mm, weighing 600 grams, and most likely Actively Cooled.

      I feel like the former (pocketable/oudoor) category fits well for ARM devices that can do emulation between the PS1 and upto PS Vita (with Android Gaming). While the latter (backpack/indoor) category fits well for x86 devices that can do emulation between the Xbox 360 and upto PS4 (with Windows Gaming).

      edit: comment section is starting to glitch out. Slow server time?