When AMD’s Ryzen 7040 Mobile “Phoenix” processors launched earlier this year, they offered a lot of bang for the buck by combining up to 8 Zen 4 CPU cores with up to 12 RDNA 3 GPU compute units. They’re also the first x86 chips to feature an integrated NPU (neural processing unit) for on-device AI acceleration.

So what’s next from AMD? More of the same… mostly. The company has taken the wraps off the new Ryzen 8040 Mobile “Hawk Point” processor family, and on paper they’re very, very similar. But AMD is promising significant performance improvements in at least one area – AI.

AMD is launching the Ryzen 8000 series with 9 new chips. All but two of them will feature a next-gen NPU featuring what AMD is calling its XDNA architecture.

The company says, among other things, users can expect a 1.4X boost in AI performance using Meta’s Llama 2 generative AI model or an unspecified “vision” model. Whereas Ryzen 7040 chips offered up to 10 TOPS of AI performance when leveraging the NPU alone (or up to 33 TOPS of combined CPU + GPU + NPU power), the company says Ryzen 8040 chips should deliver up to 16 TOPS (NPU only) or 39 TOPS (total).

So what exactly are you supposed to do with all that hardware-accelerated AI if you’re not a developer? AMD notes that companies like Adobe, Black Magic, and Zoom have already started leveraging Ryzen AI to speed up or enable features including photo filters, automatic scene detection, voice detection, or captioning in video, and more.

The company is also hoping that the more PCs with Ryzen AI-enabled chips there are in the wild, the more developers will tap into those NPUs to enable new features. And like most tech companies these days, AMD is betting big on AI being the future. The company says it’s next next-gen processors, code-named Strix Point, are coming later in 2024 and they’ll feature an advanced NPU that delivers up to a 3X performance boost over the 7040 series.

For now though, if you don’t care much about AI, there’s not that much setting the Ryzen 8040 series chips apart from the Ryzen 7040 family. They still feature up to 8 Zen 4 CPU cores, up to 12 RDNA 3 compute units, and similar frequencies to the previous-gen chips.

ModelCores / ThreadsBase / Boost freqTotal CachecTDPGPUNPU
Ryzen 9 8945HS8 / 164 GHz / 5.2 GHz24MB35 – 54WRadeon 780M (12-cores) √
Ryzen 7 8845HS8 / 163.8 GHz / 5.1 GHz24MB35 – 54WRadeon 780M (12-cores) √
Ryzen 7 8840HS8 / 163.3 GHz / 5.1 GHz24MB20-30WRadeon 780M (12-cores) √
Ryzen 7 8840U8 / 163.3 GHz / 5.1 GHz24MB15-30WRadeon 780M (12-cores) √
Ryzen 5 8645HS8 / 164.3 GHz / 5 GHz22MB35 – 54WRadeon 760M (8-cores) √
Ryzen 5 8640HS8 / 163.5 GHz / 4.9 GHz22MB20-30WRadeon 760M (8-cores) √
Ryzen 5 8640U8 / 163.5 GHz / 4.9 GHz22MB15-30WRadeon 760M (8-cores) √
Ryzen 5 8540U8 / 163.2 GHz / 4.9 GHz22MB15-30WRadeon 740M (4-cores)N/A
Ryzen 3 8440U4 / 83 GHz / 4.7GHz12MB15-30WRadeon 740M (4-cores)N/A

One thing that has changed is that AMD seems to be dividing its chips up into three different power levels. There Ryzen 8040U series processors keep the same 15-30 watt range as the Ryzen 7040U lineup.

But the Ryzen 8040HS is now divided into two different segments:

  • Ryzen 8045HS chips with 35-54W TDP are designed for gaming and mobile workstation-class laptops.
  • Ryzen 8040HS chips with 20-30W TDP should offer a bit more base performance than the U-series, while still being optimized for thinner and lighter systems.

It’s hard not to think of these as the AMD equivalent of Intel’s 28-watt P-series chips.

AMD says the first PCs powered by Ryzen 8040 chips should arrive in the first quarter of 2024, with models coming from PC makers including acer, Asus, Dell, HP, Lenovo, and Razer.

press release

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  1. One big difference that I can see is that xx45 chips are no longer limited to two lower end cores

    1. A.I. is the latest fad. It wont last. From someone who has used A.I. chatbots extensively for many months… it gets old fast.

  2. I feel like AMD watched Intel rebadge their 13th gen and though “hey, we can do that too!”

    The silver lining is that my new 7840U device will still be effectively top-of-the-line for another year, and I won’t feel like I’m missing out on much when it gets an inevitable 8840u refresh.

  3. “So what exactly are you supposed to do with all that hardware-accelerated AI if you’re not a developer? AMD notes that companies like Adobe, Black Magic, and Zoom have already started leveraging Ryzen AI …

    The company is also hoping that the more PCs with Ryzen AI-enabled chips there are in the wild, the more developers will tap into those NPUs to enable new features.

    I’ve been wondering about this. I can see various tech companies leveraging gen AI for their workloads (on high performance servers) but I always wonder what regular consumers would do that leverages these AI accelerators. The short list above doesn’t apply to many and I think that’s a lot of hoping on AMD’s part.

    For me, I guess faster and more accurate local non-cloud based language translation would be useful. Maybe accelerating/improving FSR and other related upscaling technologies would be great for lower end PCs/handhelds with iGPUs.