My first cellphone was a Nokia handset that I only had to charge once every week or two. But all I really used it for was making phone calls and occasionally playing a game of snake on a tiny screen.

Modern smartphones do a whole lot more, but they also consume far more power. And that means you usually have to charge the battery every day or two. Chinese phone maker Oukitel is bucking that trend by launching a smartphone with up to a week of battery life thanks to… a gigantic battery.

The Oukitel WP19 is a rugged phone with a 6.78 inch, 2400 x 1080 pixel display with a 90 Hz refresh rate, a MediaTek Helio G95 processor, 8GB of RAM, 256GB of storage, and Android 12 software.

Designed for outdoor use, the phone has a rugged case that’s rated IP68/IP69 for dust and water resistance and features MIL-STD-810G certification. The Oukitel WP19 also has an unusual camera system that bundles a 64MP primary camera with a 2MP macro camera and a 20MP Sony Night Vision IR camera. There’s also a 16MP front-facing camera.

But the phone’s most unusual feature? It has a 21,000 mAh battery that Oukitel says provides up to:

  • 122 hours (5 days) of continuous phone call time
  • 123 hours (5 days) of music playback
  • 36 hours (1.5 days) of video playback
  • 2252 hours (94 days) of standby time

Assuming those figures are even remotely accurate, and assuming real-world usage consists of a mix of standby and active use, and it seems reasonable to think that the phone really should be able to go a week or so between charges.

When it’s time to refuel, Oukitel says the phone supports 27W fast charging, which means it takes about 4 hours to take the battery from 0 to 100 percent capacity.

While the phone is already available from AliExpress for $600, Oukitel says the phone is expected to launch globally in June.

There are a few things to keep in mind before pulling out your wallet though. The first is that I haven’t seen any mention of just how thick this phone is or how much it weighs. But I don’t expect it to be nearly as comfortable to slide into a pocket as a typical phone.

The second is that Oukitel’s phones tend to have limited support for North American cellular networks. According to the AliExpress listing, the phone will support the following bands:

  • GSM:B2/B3/B5/B8
  • WCDMA:B1/B2/B4/B5/B8
  • TDD:B38/B40/B41
  • FDD:B1/B2/B3/B4/B5/B7/B8/B12/B13/B17/B18/B19/B20/B25/B26/B28(A+8)/B66

But whether this is a device that you’d actually find useful as a phone or not, it’s always interesting to see that it’s at least possible to build a modern phone with a battery that doesn’t need to be charged daily… if you’re willing to carry around a massive power bank that also happens to do double duty as a phone.

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  1. While I have to admit, Oukitel makes a pretty sturdy rugged phone, they are horrible if you need warranty work and getting back with you once you email them

  2. I have the Oukitel WP16. It has a 10000 mah battery, and routinely lasts me 5 days between charges. It’s ridiculously bulky. It’s good for me, because I often find myself unexpectedly requiring to use my phone for hours at a time and unable to charge. With this, I don’t really have to worry. The WP16 cost $230. $600 is too much.
    There’s even fm radio if you plugin usb-c earphones.

  3. This reminds me of the Energizer phone that got cancelled with the 18000 mAh battery (which I think was more of a publicitiy stunt). I don’t know, maybe if you can charge other devices with it as well. Debating how it would compare to just carrying around a normal sized rugged phone and having a battery bank of a size of your choice with you.

  4. This could be great for cyclists who work for delivery apps, it should provide plenty of screen-on-time and GPS functionality for their work day.

    1. People don’t “work for apps”. They work for service providers.
      I know it might seem that way when you never meet your employer and all interactions with them occur through their software on your phone, and while I know the technocrats would love it if we all worked for some giant central computer system that was supposed to be a god but really works for the technocrats, there is always going to be people behind every artificial entity even if like google they’re more machine than human.