ECS has been selling tiny desktop computers under its Liva line of devices for years, but the new ECS Liva One A300 is one of the most versatile to date. While many other models are powered by laptop-class processors that are soldered to the motherboard, the Liva One A300 has an AMD A4 socket and support for AMD Athlon and Ryzen desktop processors with TDP ratings up to 65 watts.

Unsurprisingly, in order to make room for a motherboard with an AM4 socket, the computer is a little larger than a typical ECS Liva device. But at 205 x 176 x 33mm (8.1″ x 6.9″ x 1.3″), it’s still petty compact by desktop PC standards.

The computer supports up to 64GB of DDR4-3200 dual-channel memory thanks to two SODIMM slots and there’s support for dual storage devices thanks to an M.2 2280 slot with support for PCIe Gen 3 x4 storage and a 2.5 inch bay for a hard drive or SSD.

There’s also an M.2 2230 slot for an optional wireless card, and plenty of ports, including:

  • 2 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C
  • 4 x USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • 2 x USB 2.0
  • 1 x 3.5mm mic input
  • 1 x 3.5mm combo audio jack
  • 1 x 2.5 Gbps Ethernet jack

There’s also support for three displays, although how you get there depends on the configuration you purchase. All models have an HDMI port with support for 4K @ 60 Hz output, but some have a single 4K @ 60 Hz DisplayPort connector and a VGA port, while other models double up on the DisplayPort but lack VGA. There’s also optional support for an RS-232 COM port.

ECS also offers two different top panel options. There’s a cover with ventilation that the company suggests is appropriate for systems configured with 65 watt processors, while an ECS Liva One A300 with a 35-watt processor can use a solid top panel with no vents.

press release

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  1. For me, there really is only 2 effective form factors for non-laptop computers:
    (1) NUC or Mac Mini size and (2) ATX (micro-ATX is my favorite). Anything in between is a compromise with too many negatives (which is why most companies stay away from this region)
    NUC size uses external/laptop PSU and laptop chipset.
    ATX size uses all standard components and full-size GPU.
    In my opinion ECS is wasting their time and resources on this form factor.

    1. I assume when you say “ATX”, you’re including Mini-ITX in that as well. There are some 10-12 Litre Mini-ITX cases these days that can hold a 300mm+ GPU, and several storage drives.

      I haven’t found a need to go beyond Mini-ITX in my past 2 builds.

      1. My mATX is 30L with the full-size PSU. The 30L surface area probably does 3x the heat dissipation of a 10L case. The longer dimensions allow for larger, lower RPM fans too. I believe that 30L is the sweet spot for a 100W CPU and 350W GPU case.