The DingDian S3 is a desktop computer that about the size of a thick smartphone, but under the hood likes the beating heart of a full-fledged PC including an Intel Jasper Lake processor, 16GB of RAM and support for up to two SSDs.

If the pocket-sized computer looks familiar, that’s because the chassis is virtually identical to the Morefine M6 and Topton M6. But those models are powered by an Intel Celeron N5105 chips while the DingDian S3 has a Pentium Silver N6000 processor instead. The S3 is expected to sell for $369 and up at retail, but DingDian is running a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign that lets you reserve one for as little as $249.

While you’d normally expect higher performance from a Pentium chip than a Celeron, that’s not actually the case here. Both the Celeron N5105 and Pentium Silver N6000 are 4-core, 4-thread processors based on Intel Jasper Lake architecture. But the former is a 10-watt chip with 2 GHz base and 2.9 GHz burst speeds, while the latter is a 6-watt chip with 1.1 GHz base and 3.3 GHz burst speeds.

The result is that you’ll probably get better single-core and multi-core performance from the Celeron N5105, but slightly better energy efficiency from the Pentium Silver N6000.

That said, the $249 starting price could make the DingDian S3 an attractive alternative for folks willing to risk the uncertainty of a crowdfunding campaign… and willing to wait a few months for delivery. The crowdfunding campaign ends April 10, 2022 and DingDian expects to begin shipping the S3 to backers in June.

For $249 you can reserve a model with 128GB of storage, but you can also pay extra for 512GB or 1TB versions. All versions have 16GB of DDR4 2933 MHz memory, which is soldered to the mainboard and not user replaceable. But the little computer does have upgradeable storage: there’s an M.2 2280 slot for PCIe NVMe SSDs and an M.2 2242 slot for SATA storage.

The S3 measures 150 x 80 x 19mm ( 6.1″ x 3.1″ x 0.75″) and weighs 195 grams (about 6.9 ounces) and has a selection of ports that includes:

  • 1 x HDMI 2.0
  • 1 x USB Type-C (full function)
  • 1 x USB Type-C (power input)
  • 3 x USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-A
  • 1 x 3.5mm audio
  • 1 x 2.5 Gbps Ethernet

DingDian notes that while the computer is designed for desktop rather than mobile use, it can be powered from any portable power bank that supports 12V/2A output over USB Type-C.

There’s also an Intel AX201 wireless card with support for WiFi 6 and Bluetooth 5.2.

via /r/MiniPCs

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  1. The webpage of the “manufacturer” was registered in last December, there are shady things around them.
    On the campaign page N5105 is mentioned as the SoC with 8GB onboard memory and a slot to expand it, while everywhere else there’s N6000 with 16GB soldered RAM.
    At least Morefine seems to be trustworthy, but DingDianPC (well, Yingboda Intelligent Technology Co., Ltd.) is a “brand” I’m not brave enough to put my money on.
    Seems to be another case of too good to be true for me.

    1. This information has also been verified. They are a cooperative company and are produced in one factory. N6000 is an upgraded version of n5105. The two brands are differentiated. More ine will not mak

    2. “Morefine seems to be trustworthy”

      Lol.. How? By putting the $220 M6 pocket pc you can find all over Aliexpress and charging you $300 bucks for it?!

      It’s the same repackaging indiegogo scam that “mobiscribe” did years ago on their first eink tablet.