The Chuwi LarkBook X is a thin and light laptop with a 14 inch display, an all-metal design, a backlit keyboard, and a fanless design. But it’s also a relatively inexpensive notebook that’s expected to sell for less than $500 when it goes on sale in mid-August.

That’s because it’s powered by an Intel Celeron N5100 Jasper Lake processor, which is a 6 watt, processor designed for low-power, low-cost devices.

The good news is that the chip is one of Intel’s most recent, and most powerful processors based on Intel Atom technology. It’s a 4-core, 4-thread chip with a base frequency of 1.1 GHz, top burst speeds as high as 2.8 GHz, and Intel UHD integrated graphics with 24 execution units and support for speeds ranging from 350 MHz to 800 MHz.

With a 6 watt TDP, the chip also doesn’t generate much heat, which is what allows Chuwi to use it in a compact, fanless laptop. The notebook weighs 1.4kg (about 3.1 pounds) and measures 10mm (about 0.4″) thick and features an aluminum-magnesium body.

Chuwi says the notebook also has 8GB of RAM and 256GB of solid state storage. And the LarkBook X has a 14 inch display with a 16:10 aspect ratio and a “2K” resolution, which likely means either 2160 1 350 or 2560 x 1600.

More details should be available closer to launch.

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    1. Firmware-based TPM is ubiquitous in modern Intel and AMD processors, it’s part of those black boxes called respectively IME (Intel Management Engine) and PSP (Platform Security Processor) that stealthily run inside your processors.