The AMD 4700S 8-Core Processor Desktop Kit is a compact desktop computer motherboard paired with a previously unannounced processor called the AMD 4700S. It’s a processor with 8-core, 16-thread processor with CPU cores based on AMD’s Zen 2 architecture and no integrated graphics.

Signs point to the chip being a version of the custom processor AMD designed for the Xbox Series X. So if you’ve ever wanted to use that processor in a desktop computer, maybe you’ll be able to do that now… although AMD hasn’t announced pricing or availability details. Update: The chip maker tells Tom’s Hardware that PC makers will begin introducing systems based on the AMD 4700S kit on June 24, 2021.

 

The first time we heard about the AMD 4700S was when a small form-factor desktop computer powered by the processor went on sale in China earlier this year. That’s when internet sleuths noticed the similarity between the processor and the chip used in Microsoft’s latest game console.

According to AMD, its new Desktop Kit pairs the processor with a motherboard featuring a single PCIe x16 slot that can handle up to Radeon RX 590 or NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 graphics. In other words, don’t expect features like hardware-accelerated, real-time ray tracing. If you’re looking to build a modern gaming PCs, this might not be the kit to choose.

You’ll definitely need a graphics card if you plan to use the board as the foundation of a desktop computer though – it doesn’t have its own built-in DisplayPort, HDMI, or even VGA port so you’ll likely need to rely on a GPU card for vide output.

But the board does have three audio jacks, a Gigabit Ethernet port, two SATA connectors, three USB 3.2 Gen 2 10 Gbps Type-A ports, one USB 3.1 Gen 1 5Gbps port, and four USB 2.0 Type-A ports.

According to the statement issued to Tom’s Hardware, AMD expects “to see over 80 designs come to market from our SI [System Integrator] partners.” Some models are already available in Asia, where they tend to sell for around $320 – $700, but it’s unclear with if or when we’ll see models hit the Western Hemisphere.

via Hexus and TechPowerUp

This article was originally published June 30, 2021 and last updated July 11, 2021. 

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  1. I thought we already know that it’s actually the PS5’s APU, not an Xbox one. The confusion just came from the fact that it uses the same Southbridge as the A9-9820 motherboards that had the OG Xbox One APU.

    1. The PS4/5 and the Xbox One/X have very very similar CPU/GPU. The Xbox One/PS4 had nearly the exact same, same chipset and RAM amounts.

  2. The Techpowerup article explains that it’s really PCI-Express 2.0 x4. x16 cards will fit into the connector, but if they don’t work with PCI-Express 2.0 x4, they won’t work at all.
    I’d also to bet on rejected console processors going into these things. Those wouldn’t have a lot of lanes to begin with and most of them went to the GPU.

  3. We need someone to remove that cooler and take a die shot already. So far it seems signs point towards more of it being the PS5 APU, since the RAM is on the back and apparently some of the traces look similar to those on the PS5 board.

    1. It’s not an APU, they specifically said it doesn’t have integrated graphics.

      However, there’s a decent chance this is a product AMD made by using rejected Xbox or PS5 chips that failed QC tests on their integrated GPU, and perhaps the GPU is just disabled?

      1. It was originally an APU but theory is that these are the APU with bad GPU components that did make the cut and AMD is selling the rejects.

        1. Actually I heard that these are just APUs that AMD is selling with the GPU disabled because the GPUs were faulty.

      2. It’s still an APU, even if the the graphics are disabled. The structure of the chip is still that of an APU.