The Topton D3 is a desktop computer that measures 5.3″ x 5.3″ x 2″ and which is powered by an AMD Ryzen 5 4500U processor. That’s a 15-watt, hexa-core chip designed for use in laptops, but which has also been tapped for other products like the AYA Neo handheld gaming computer.

The little desktop PC also has some features you don’t typically find in laptops, including dual Ethernet ports, full-sized DisplayPort and HDMI 2.0 ports, and support for up to three 4K displays when you use them both as well as the computer’s USB Type-C port.

Topton is a Chinese company, but the Topton D3 is available for purchase internationally from the Topton AliExpress store. Prices start at $475 for a barebones model.

You’ll pay a little extra if you want a system that comes with memory and storage.

Under the hood of the little computer, there are two SODIMM slots for dual-channel DDR4 memory, an M.2 2280 slot for PCIe 3.0 x4 storage, and a 2.5 inch drive bay, and prices start at about $556 for a version with 8GB of RAM and a 128GB NVMe SSD, but you can also configure the system with up to 32GB of RAM and up to 1TB of solid state storage plus a 2TB hard drive.

Other features include support for WiFi 6 and Bluetooth 5.1, a single headphone jack, two USB 3.0 Type-A ports, two USB 2.0 Type-A ports, a USB 3.1 Type-C port, and a second USB-C port that’s just for power input, as far as a I can tell.

The Topton D3 is actively cooled so, as with any computer that has a fan, don’t expect it to run silently. But its compact size means you should be able to hide it behind a display, under a desk, or anywhere else where it may be unobtrusive.

via AndroidPC.es

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    1. That’s about as tiny as one could expect a PC with this kind of power to be.

      And I don’t think we’re going to see many Mini PCs designed for the Chinese-market that are on the leading-edge of AMD chipsets anytime soon. They’re always going to be behind a bit due to the increased engineering costs that small OEMs don’t want to absorb. Many of the smaller manufacturers in China are making low cost products with borrowed, or licensed designs that are lower cost due to being a generation or more old.

      The reason is that there are dozens of “reference designs” for older Intel motherboards that are just floating around among PCB/Motherboard designers in China. If you pay a PC OEM in China to make you a specific design of Intel-powered Mini PC, their engineer will probably pull up a reference design, and make a small amount of changes to suit the project.

      I’ve inquired with some OEMs in China in the past about Intel and AMD motherboard designs, and it seems there’s no shortage of Intel designs that can be made for very reasonable design costs (with a reasonable minimum-order). However, I had a hard time finding someone to make an AMD Ryzen (1st gen) without paying for expensive engineering work.

      Most of the companies that have reference designs for AMD motherboards are Taiwanese giants like Asus, Asrock, Gigabyte, etc. They all protect their IP closely, and don’t work with PCB manufacturers with sticky fingers.