Intel launched the first discrete graphics processor based on its Iris Xe technology last year, but so far only a handful of laptops have shipped with Intel Iris Xe MAX graphics, and performance is nothing to write home about.

But now details about Intel’s next-gen discrete GPU are starting to leak. According to a report from Igor’s Lab, Intel’s upcoming DG2 GPU is set to hit the streets in late 2021, starting with devices including laptop computers.

An “older” diagram showing DG2 with Intel Tiger Lake H

Igor’s Lab reports that the first computers to ship with Intel DG2 graphics will have the GPU paired with Intel’s upcoming Alder Lake-P processors, with the CPU and GPU communicating via a PCIe 4.0 x12 connection.

As many as five different versions of the Intel DG2 could be available, with entry-level versions featuring 4GB of RAM and 128 execution units, while a top-of-the-line version will have 16GB of memory and 512GB execution units plus substantially higher base and turbo frequencies.

You can find a more detailed breakdown at Igor’s Lab. Just keep in mind that nothing is official until Intel makes an announcements, but with Intel engineer Peter Brubaker tweeting this week that DG2 is “right around the corner,” we might not have to wait too long for confirmation.

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  1. It seems promising, and I like the way it scales:
    512 EU – 300W ? – 16GB – 2160p 4K Gaming – High End Desktop
    256 EU – 150W ? – 8GB – 1440p Gaming – Mainstream Desktop
    128 EU – 75W ? – 4GB – 1080p Gaming – Low-end Desktop
    64 EU – 37W ? – 2GB – 720p Gaming – Ultrabooks
    32 EU – 18W ? – 1GB – 480p Gaming – Handhelds

    Nonetheless, it doesn’t look like it holds up well against RDNA-2, let alone Nvidia’s RTX-3000 series. More like competition for Navi/RDNA-1 and GTX-1000. Still would be a good option in 2020-2021 for crypto miners, and gamers due to the Supply Shortages.

    I feel like Intel was probably late (shocker!) to the market with this +10nm node, and this first-gen architecture. It needed to be out in 2018. And this new GPU Division could have kept the company rolling as their CPU Division tried getting their ship together. Or we can blame all of Intel’s problems only on their Lithography Division, who cares anymore at this point.

    1. The base for XeLP is 96EU on mobile 11th Gen Tigerlake U chips. The cut down version of that is 32EU in Rocketlake and Tigerlake-H.

      128EU is the smallest for discrete graphics DG2.

      The 512EU is expected to perform at RTX 3070+.