Most modern eReaders feature touchscreen displays, but typically that means they combine an E Ink display with a separate touch sensor laminated on top of the display.

Now E Ink has introduced new technology that allows touch to be built directly into its electronic paper displays. The company says the end result is screens that look better, cost less, and still allow you to interact via touch input.

The new E Ink On-Cell Touch ePaper module could be used in next-gen eReaders and other devices with electronic paper displays.

According to E Ink, the module is compatible with its latest color and black and white displays and in both cases it should bring improved visuals:

  • E Ink Carta grayscale screens have 30-percent higher contrast ratios with On-Cell Touch
  • E Ink Kaleido color screens have a 40-percent higher contrast ratio and 15-percent better color saturation with On-Cell Touch

The new technology can be used in flexible E Ink displays or screens with glass TFT backplane.

As for the cost savings, it’s unclear just how much the new technology will lower the bill of materials for device makers, or if those savings will be passed along to consumers.

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

Join the Conversation

1 Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. This is great! Now all we need is Wacom to partner with theem to bring us tablets dedicated to artists. Imagine a device with native drawing software as part of its UI. No need to download an app. Much like how many e-readers go about providing a good reading experience with minimalism, the same could be done with an illustration-centric tablet device. I should draw a mockup to give people ideas.