The Chuwi CoreBook X is a laptop with a 14 inch, 2160 x 1440 pixel IPS display, an Intel Core i5-8259U processor with Iris Plus 655 graphics, 8GB of RAM, and 256GB of storage.

Basically it’s a notebook that combines modern design elements (like a 3:2 aspect ratio display) with previous-gen premium hardware (like the processor that powered Apple’s 2018 MacBook Pro).

The end result is a laptop that’s set to ship on June 3 with prices starting at $539. You can sign up Chuwi’s CoreBook X promotion website to score a discount when orders begin.

Chuwi is a Chinese PC maker that’s been selling budget laptops, tablets, and mini PCs for a number of years. But recently the company has moved into the mid-range space by using an interesting strategy.

While some companies keep costs down by pairing current-gen hardware (like 11th-gen Intel Core chips or AMD Ryzen 4000 or 5000 series processors) with mediocre design (flimsy plastic cases), Chuwi instead goes for premium design features like unibody aluminum chassis and instead saves money by using previous-gen processors.

The new CoreBook X, for example, seems to be an update to last year’s CoreBook Pro, a $499 laptop with a 13.2 inch, 2160 x 1440 pixel display and a 2016-era Intel Core i3-6157U processor with Iris 550 graphics.

By updating to a newer (but still old) chip, the CoreBook X should bring significant performance gains. The Core i3-6157U and Core i5-8259U chips are both 28-watt processors, but not only is the 8th-gen processor two years newer, but it also has twice as many CPU cores and threads (it’s a 4-core/8-thread chip), support for turbo boost speeds, and upgraded graphics.

Other features for the new CoreBook X include a 46.2 Wh battery, USB-C and USB-A ports, and a headset jack.

One thing to keep in mind is that Chuwi says customers in Europe who buy the CoreBook X will get a product shipped from a Spanish warehouse, while customers in other parts of the world will have their items shipped from China via DHL. And Chuwi, like most Chinese PC makers that ship internationally, tends to have an iffy track record when it comes to customer service and support.

 

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  1. Problem with Chuwi in the past has been cooling (very noisy devices even at idle) and poor battery cells that degrade quickly… 2 things which are, of course, not covered by warranty (and there is no local support anyway, any defect and you need to ship to China and pay the shipping, they only cover shipping back to you after a couple of months).

  2. Excellent value if you’re willing to ship it to Hongkong on your dime if you need warranty services. Which is about in 2-3 months.

  3. This looks like a nice laptop for $539. I’d like to see a Linux version, but then the price would double. I don’t understand why similar laptops running Linux haveto cost over $1k.

    1. What is stopping you from installing linux yourself ? I doubt these chinese makers will go through the trouble of selecting the best compatibility with linux .. best hardware with best drivers and complete possibly even low level documentation.

  4. This is a pretty good value if you’re shopping for a 3:2 laptop. If you compare it to the $550 entry model of the Surface Laptop Go (best comparison I can think of for a 3:2 laptop), the Chuwi has double the RAM, 4x the storage space (and it’s an SSD in the Chuwi, and eMMC in the Surface). It also has a significantly higher resolution screen.

    $539 is somewhat reasonable of a price point for me to consider buying something overseas that has no warranty. And the 8th gen i5 isn’t old enough that I’d be giving up any major features. The only thing that really matters to me for Intel’s previous generations is h265 video support, and that has been sufficient since the 7th gen.

    1. While I have yet to confirm anywhere else, be aware one review I read indicated this model has glossy, non-touch display – which seemed kind of odd combination. Non-touch fine but glossy a definite deal-breaker for me.
      Disappointing as I otherwise would have considered based on previous positive experience with similar Chuwi LapBook 12.3

      1. It has 185ppi, I’d say that’s a mostly reasonable pixel density to use a glossy screen.

        Some 2560×1440 15.6″ screens have a glossy finish, as opposed to matte, to increase sharpness. Those screens have the exact same pixel density.

        It could also depend on the colour gamut they’re calibrating for. Matte screen finishes diffract light by scattering it, which makes colours more dull, and lowers contrast.

        Having said that, I would personally prefer a matte screen myself to reduce glare.