The latest small form factor desktop computer from Asus is a 6.9″ x 6.9″ x 1.7″ computer powered by up to a 65-watt Intel Rocket Lake-S processor.

The Asus Mini PC PB62 supports up to 64GB of DDR4-3200 memory, support for up to three storage devices, plenty of ports, and it comes in black or white color options. Designed for use in business applications including point-of-sales systems, kiosks, and vending machines, the computer has been tested to meet MIL-STD-810H standards for durability and reliability.

Asus says the PB62 isn’t just small, but also relatively quiet and energy efficient, consuming as little as 13.37 watts of power and generating as little as 21.7 dB of noise when idle. It can be attached to the back of a display with a VESA mount or used as a standalone computer, and there’s a new dust filter on the front of the computer help protect it when used in industrial environments or regions where smog and other particulates are a problem.

The computer supports up to three 4K displays thanks to two DisplayPort ports, a USB type-C port, and a configurable port that can be used for DisplayPort, HDMI, VGA, or Ethernet.

Other ports include separate mic and headphone jacks, an RJ45 port for Gigabit Ethernet, and a whole bunch of USB Type-A ports:

  • 1 x USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-C
  • 4 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A
  • 1 x USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • 2 x USB 2.0 Type-A

Under the hood, the computer has two SODIMM slots for DDR4-3200 memory and support for three storage devices:

  • 1 x 2.5″ drive bay for HDD or SSD
  • 1 x M.2 2280 PCIe 4 x4 for SSD
  • 1 x M.2 2280 PCIe 3 x4 for SSD

There’s also optional support for WiFi 6, Bluetooth 5.0, and a 1W built-in speaker.

ProcessorIntelCore™ i7-11700 / i5-11500 / i5-11400 / i3-10305/ i3-10105 / PentiumGold G6405/ CeleronG5905 (65W)
IntelCore™ i7-11700T / i5-11500T / i5-11400T / i3-10305T / i3-10105T / PentiumGold G6405T / CeleronG5905T (35W)
ChipsetIntel B560 chipset
GraphicsIntelUHD integrated graphics
Memory2 x SO-DIMM DDR4 3200 MHz (up to 64 GB)
Storage1 x M.2 2280/2242 (256GB / 512 GB / 1 TB PCIE G4X4),
1 x M.2 2280 (256 GB / 512 GB / 1 TB PCIE G3X4)
1 x SATA 6 Gbps (2.5″ 7200 RPM 1 TB HDD)
*Support Optane memory/Support NVMe SSD
LAN10/100/1000 Mbps
Wireless networksIntelWiFi 6 AX201 + BT V5, 2*2
Front and Side I/O4 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A (1 w/QC)
1 x USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-C
2 x Audio jacks (Mic-in/Headphone)
Rear I/O1 x USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
2 x USB 2.0
1 x RJ45 LAN
2 x DisplayPort 1.2
1 x Configurable ports (HDMI 2.0 / VGA / COM / DisplayPort / LAN)
1 x Kensington lock
1 x DC-in
Power supply88%, 150 W (65 W) / 120 W (35 W, i7) / 90W (35 W)
Dimension175 x 175 x 42 mm
Weight1.3 kg (HDD included)

press release

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  1. There’s one part that’s confusing me. How can it consume only 13w when the CPU is 65w? Or is this on standby?

    1. The article says “consuming as little as 13.37 watts”

      65w is the TDP of the CPU, it’s not an indication of how much power it typically consumes in various use. TDP is a maximum measurement.

      I have a medium-level gaming PC that has a TDP (all parts combined) of nearly 400w, however in average use it consumes around 100-200w.