ECS is expanding its Liva Q line of tiny computers with two new models sporting ARM-based processors. The new ECS Liva Q1A and ECS Liva Q1A Plus both measure just 2.9″ x 2.9″ x 1.4″ making the little computer small enough to fit in the palm of your hand, much like the Liva Q1D and Q1L models that launched in 2020.

 

But while the older versions were Windows and Linux-ready PCs powered by Intel Apollo Lake processors, the new models are powered by Rockchip’s ARM processors and they’re designed to run Android 8.1 or Ubuntu 18.04 software.

ECS says the little computers feature a fanless design with an aluminum heat sink to keep the system silent and cool during operation. They feature 802.11b/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, and Gigabit Ethernet support as well as HDMI 2.0 output with support for HDMI CEC remote controls.

The company is positioning them as solutions for digital signage, but they could also be used for other applications where small size is more important than Windows compatibility or blazing-fast speeds.

Here’s a run-down of the key specs for the new models, and how they stack up against their Intel-powered siblings.

Liva Q1ALiva Q1A PlusLIVA Q1DLIVA Q1L
ProcessorRockchip RK3288
Quad-core Cortex-A17 up to 1.6GHz
Rockchip RK3399
Dual-core Cortex-A72 up to 1.8GHz
Quad-core Cortex-A53 up to 1.4GHz
Intel Apollo Lake Pentium N4200 SOC
Intel Apollo Lake Celeron N3350 SOC
Intel Apollo Lake Pentium N4200 SOC
Intel Apollo Lake Celeron N3350 SOC
Memory2GB LPDDR3-16002GB LPDDR3-1600LPDDR4 2GB/ 4GBLPDDR4 2GB/ 4GB
StorageeMMC 32GB/ 64GB (Optional)
1 x Micro SD Slot (Max. 128GB)
eMMC 32GB/ 64GB (Optional)
1 x Micro SD Slot (Max. 128GB)
eMMC 32GB/ 64GB
1 x Micro SD Slot (Max. 128GB)
eMMC 32GB/ 64GB
1 x Micro SD Slot (Max. 128GB)
Network1 x Gigabit LAN1 x Gigabit LAN1 x Gigabit LAN2 x Gigabit LAN
Video Output1 x HDMI 2.01 x HDMI 2.0
1 x DisplayPort 1.2
1 x HDMI 2.0
1 x DisplayPort 1.2
1 x HDMI 2.0
Wireless802.11b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.0
802.11b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.0
802.11 ac/b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.1
802.11 ac/b/g/n
Bluetooth 4.1
USB3 x USB 2.0
1 x Micro USB
1 x Micro SD card
1 x USB 3.2 Gen 1×1
2 x USB 2.0
1 x Micro SD card
2 x USB 3.2 Gen1
1 x USB 2.0
2 x USB 3.2 Gen1
1 x USB 2.0
Dimension74 x 74 x 34.6 mm74 x 74 x 34.6 mm74 x 74 x 34.6 mm74 x 74 x 34.6 mm
OS SupportAndroid 8.1
Ubuntu 18.04
Android 8.1
Ubuntu 18.04
Windows 10 64bitWindows 10 64bit
Power12V/ 2A, 24W12V/ 2A, 24WInput: AC 100-240V
Output: DC 12V / 2A
Input: AC 100-240V
Output: DC 12V / 2A

 

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

Join the Conversation

4 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. My biggest concern is that the ARM equipped computers only have 2GB of RAM. Tablets has more RAM and most run a modified version of Android, running a production computer on only 2GB of RAM would be almost enough to induce a psychotic break from the computer freezing up while shuttling tasks in and out of swap. From experience a full Ubuntu system would literally live in swap with that little RAM, just booting it up will almost use up that little RAM. I use Xubuntu and I even go as high as 3GB of RAM usage with that distro (which is a drastically cut down Ubuntu using the XFCE GUI instead of either Unity or GNOME 3). Lubuntu 18.04 (with the LXDE GUI) even pushed 2GB with moderate use and that is the lightest production distro around (I don’t think Puppy Linux and others like it are appropriate for the average computer user).

    The extremely limited hard drive or SSD in these is also maddening. A modern computer should have 500GB in a base model and go up from there. My main computer has over a terabyte on it (it has both Windows 10 and Xubuntu 20.04 partitions), I have a 2TB drive in it. I hope at least these are priced appropriately — they are probably no better than the $100 mini computers available from the usual suspects.

  2. The lack of 802.11ac on the ARM models is a no-go for me. 802.11n is practically unusable in my area unless it is a 2×2 MIMO dual band adapter.

    1. Grant,

      I could live with Wireless N, what boggles the mind for me is 2GB? Seriously? In 2021? I remember when 2GB was all the rage and that was when I purchased a little asus 11.6″ laptop that came with ubuntu 12.04. At the time I can still recall that it was barely usable…

      I’d love to purchase the ECS Q1A Plus….but essentially…there is no PLUS about it.

      Yet another miss with ECS.

      Steven

      P.S. Brad…Despite not all of them being hits…I did want to mention that I appreciate your keeping us updated on all of the latest mini pc launches, updates etc. I love these little computers.