About a year and a half after introducing the first Dell Optiplex Ultra computers which stuff the guts of a PC into a monitor stand, Dell is expanding the lineup with two new models.

The new Dell Optiplex 7090 Ultra is a computer-in-a-module that supports up to a 28 watt Intel Corei7-1185G7 processor and has enough horsepower to drive up to four displays, while the Dell Optiplex 3090 Ultra is a lower-cost option powered by 11th-gen Intel Core i5, Core i3,or Celeron processors running at 15 watts.

The new systems should be available January 28 with starting prices of $769 and $659, respectively.

At first glance, Dell’s OptiPlex Ultra look a bit like iMacs or other all-in-one desktop computers. But the PC isn’t built into the display itself. Instead it live in the stand… and it’s removable, making an OptiPlex Ultra easier to upgrade than a typical all-in-one.

You can remove the computer itself rom the monitor stand, open it up and replace the memory or storage. Or if you want a more powerful system altogether, you can keep your display but swap out the OptiPlex Ultra computer itself for a whole new PC module.

Both the OptiPlex 7090 Ultra and OptiPlex 3090 Ultra are available with up to 64GB of DDR4-3200 memory, M. 2230 PCIe NVMe SSD and/or 2.5 inch hard drives, and support for Windows 10 or Ubuntu Linux.

But there are a few differences in configuration options.

Optiplex 7090 UltraOptiplex 3090 Ultra
Processor
  • 11th Generation Intel Corei3-1115G4, 6 MB Cache2 Cores, 4 Thread, 3.0 GHz to 4.1 GHz, 28 W
  • 11th Generation Intel Corei5-1145G7, vPRO, 8 MB Cache, 4 Cores, 8 Thread, 2.6 GHz to 4.4 GHz, 28 W
  • 11th Generation Intel Corei7-1185G7, vPRO, 12 MB Cache, 4 Cores, 8 Thread, 3.0 GHz to 4.8 GHz, 28 W
  • 11th Generation Intel Corei3-1115G4, 6 MB Cache, 2 Cores, 4 Thread, 3.0 GHz to 4.1 GHz, 15 W
  • 11th Generation Intel Core i5-1145G7, 8 MB Cache, 4 Cores, 8 Thread, 2.6 GHz to 4.4 GHz, 15 W
  • Intel Celeron 6305, 4 MB Cache, 2 Cores, 2 Thread, Up to 1.80 GHz, 15 W
Side ports
  • 1 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A port with PowerShare
  • 1 x USB 4Type-Cwith DisplayPort Alt Mode/Thunderbolt 4.0
  • 1 x Headset/Universal Audio Jack
  • 1 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A port with PowerShare
  • 1 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A port
  • 1 x Headset/Universal Audio Jack
Rear ports
  • 2 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A with SmartPower On
  • 1 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C port with Display Port (Alt Mode/Power delivery)
  • 1 x DisplayPort 1.4 + + HBR2 port
  • 1 x RJ45 Network Connector
  • 1 x 4.50 mm x 2.90 mm DC-in port
  • 2 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A with SmartPower On
  • 1 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C port with DisplayPort (Alt Mode/ Power delivery)
  • 1 x DisplayPort 1.4 + + HBR2
  • 1 x RJ45 Network Connector
  • 1 x 4.50 mm x 2.90 mm DC-in port
Wireless
  • QualcommQCA61x4a 802.11ac dual band 2×2+ Bluetooth5.0
  • Intel Wi-Fi 6 AX201 2×2 (Gig+) + Bluetooth5.1
  • QualcommQCA61x4a 802.11ac dual band 2×2 + Bluetooth5.0
  • QualcommQCA9377 802.11ac dual band 1×1 + Bluetooth5.0
  • Intel Wi-Fi 6 AX201 2×2 (Gig+) + Bluetooth5.1

The Dell Optiplex Ultra comes from Dell’s business computer line, but you don’t need to be a business or enterprise customer to buy one – the previous-gen Dell Optiplex 7070 Ultra with an 8th-gen Intel Whiskey Lake-U processors is available purchase from Dell.com.

Dell Optiplex 7090 Ultra

Dell Optiplex 3090 Ultra

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  1. Can you imagine being the IT person that was called to fix one of these, and the issue was that the user accidentally unplugged that little USB cord that goes from the panel to the PC? It looks like that could only be plugged back in by removing the back panel from the stand.