Intel is expected to launch its “Panther Canyon” NUC mini PCs with Intel Tiger Lake chips any day now. But while we’re waiting for an official announcement, detailed specs have been leaked by @9550pro.

In a nutshell, expect a computer that measures as little as 4.6″ x 4.4″ x 1.5″, but which supports up to a 28 watt Intel Core i7-1165G7 processor, 64GB of RAM, PCIe NVMe storage, and has plenty of ports for peripherals.

@9550pro

Those ports include:

  • 2 x Thunderbolt 4
  • 4 x USB 3.1 Gen 2
  • 1 x 2.5 Gbps Ethernet
  • 1 x HDMI 2.0b
  • 1 x Mini DisplayPort 1.4
  • 3.5mm audio

The system supports up to four displays and has enough horsepower to handle 8K content, features WiFi 6 and Bluetooth 5 wireless connectivity, and has an IR port on the front for folks that want to use an infrared remote control.

There are also four microphones with support for beam-forming and far-field voice detection, allowing you to use Cortana, Alexa, or other voice assistant software.

As usual, Intel will offer “slim” and “tall” versions of the NUC. The slim version measures 1.5 inches high and has an M.2 2280 slot for storage, while the tall version is 2 inches high and supports both an M.2 2280 SSD and a 2.5 inch, 7mm SATA 3 hard drive or SSD.

Intel will also offer an optional wireless charging top cover that adds an extra 0.2 inches to the height of the computer, but allows you to charge a phone or other gadgets by placing them atop the case. The wireless charging lid supports 15 watt fast charging.

The official name for the Panther Canyon NUC is “Intel NUC 11 Performance,” and it will be available with three different processor options:

While these are the same chips that power many current-gen laptops, most notebook computer makers configure the chips with a 15 watt TDP in order to balance power consumption and performance. Battery life isn’t an issue for these mini-desktop computers, so the 11th-gen Intel Core “Tiger Lake” processors will have a 28 watt TDP in the Panther Canyon NUC.

And if you need more graphics performance than you can get from the integrated graphics, the inclusion of Thunderbolt 4 ports allows you to connect an external graphics dock.

Click to view full size

via NotebookCheck

 

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  1. I’m disappointed in the NUC 11 announcement. An earlier leak had the NUCs with HDMI 2.1 which seems to have been dropped in favor of DP 1.4 — not a big deal in performance but these NUCs won’t be able to drive an 8K TV which is what I want to do.

      1. Thank you. I have had my hopes on a computer with HDMI 2.1 to run 8K for over a year.
        I’m an artist and I currently use NUCs with (cheap) 40 inch 4K screens and I have been looking forward to using much larger screens. I won’t use anything with less than 100dpi, so 8K is the way forward, even if it is expensive.

        http://www.fourteenthstreetstudio.com

  2. comparing this model NUC 11 VS the asus PN50 with amd rizen
    R7 4700 and let me know the results
    Many thanks
    VR