Laptops with Intel Tiger Lake processors and Intel Iris Xe integrated graphics are already delivering graphics performance that’s on par with what you’d expect from an entry-level discrete GPU from NVIDIA.

But Intel isn’t stopping with integrated graphics. The first laptops with Intel Xe MAX discrete GPUs began shipping last month. And soon Intel Xe graphics will power cloud gaming and media streaming thanks to the new Intel Server GPU featuring Intel Xe-LP technology.

According to Intel, the new discrete graphics solution for servers is “designed specifically for high-density, low-latency Android cloud gaming and media streaming.”

The GPU is a low-power system-on-a-chip with 8GB of dedicated DDR4 memory, a 128-bit pipeline, and it will debut on Intel’s new H3C XG310 PCIe card which packs four Intel Server GPUs onto a full-height x16 PCIe Gen 3.0 card.

Intel says a “typical two-card system” can handle Android cloud game streaming to between 100 and 160 simultaneous users.

The company says its Intel Server GPU is now shipping, which means it could end up in data centers for cloud gaming and media streaming soon. While Intel is positioning its first data center cards as appropriate for Android games, the chip maker is already working on higher-performance server graphics technology which could power more resource-intensive applications in the future.

Intel says it’s starting to make its Xe-HP GPU available to “select developers” now, which means that the company’s first high-performance server graphics processors could be more widely available next year.

There’s no word on when we’ll see Intel Xe-HPG graphics for gaming PCs, but Intel’s Raja Koduri says the first GPU based on this technology has “successfully exited our Powered-On labs.” And, as announced earlier this year, the company is still working on Intel Xe-HPC for “exa-scale” graphics.

press release

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