Intel could launch a compact gaming desktop PC featuring a 10nm Intel Tiger Lake U-series processor and discrete graphics by the end of the year.

According to a leaked product roadmap shared by @momomo_us, the upcoming “Intel NUC Extreme” will have a 1.35 liter chassis, making it a little bigger than the 1.21L “Hades Canyon” model that launched in 2018, but significantly smaller than most gaming PCs, including Intel’s “Ghost Canyon” NUC systems that hit the streets earlier this year.

And… that’s about all the roadmap really tells us about Intel’s next-gen NUC Extreme gaming PC.

There’s no word on which third-party GPU it will use, what it will look like, or even what generation Intel is going to brand its Tiger Lake chips under — although there are some hints elsewhere in the roadmap that Intel will be launching 11th-gen Core chips toward the end of the year. So if I had to guess I’d say Tiger Lake processors will be among the first processors sold under the Intel 11th-gen Core brand.

Given that Tiger Lake chips are expected to be the first processors with Intel Xe integrated graphics (offering twice the performance of the Intel Iris Plus graphics in chips like the Core i5-1065G7), it’s interesting that Intel is still opting for third-party graphics.

A few other details from the leaked product roadmap:

  • Frost Canyon NUC mini PCs with 10th-gen Intel Core chips will be supported at least through the end of 2021.
  • The same goes for Provo Canyon (Intel NUC Pro with 8th-gen vPro chips), June Canyon (with Intel Gemini Lake chips) and Chaco Canyon (with rugged, fanless cases and Apollo Lake chips).
  • Ghost Canyon and Quartz Canyon 5L systems with Intel Compute Element mainboards and support for removable discrete graphics cards are also on track for support through the end of 2021, with no upgrades to these models planned.
  • A new Intel NUC Pro Chassis Element with U-series chips should be available in the second half of 2020.
  • An “Elk Bay” NUC 11 Compute Element with support for Celeron through Core i7 vPro chips is coming in late 2020. This may be the element designed to work with the NUC Pro Chassis Element mentioned above.

via TechPowerUp

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  1. Why Intel, why? Gamers are quite value-conscious in these fiscal times. Haven’t you learned your lesson from Hades Canyon and Ghost Canyon?