The Station P1 Geek Mini PC is a compact computer with a 6-core, 64-bit ARM processor, 4GB of RAM, support for 4K video playback, a fanless design, and an aluminum alloy case. The system is designed to support Ubuntu or Android operating systems, as well as the Android-based Phoenix OS.

It’s made by Firefly, a company that crowdfunded a single-board computer with the same processor back in 2016. But this version has more memory and storage. It comes with a case (the original board did not). And it has a lower starting price.

The Firefly Station P1 sells for $129 and up.

The starting price is for a model with a Rockchip RK3399 processor, 4GB of RAM, and 32GB of eMMC storage. Or for $50 more you can get a version with 128GB of storage.

While the RK3399 processor is a few years old at this point, it’s a pretty capable little chip that features:

  • 2 x ARM Cortex-A72 CPU cores
  • 4 x ARM CortexA-53 CPU cores
  • ARM Mali-T860 MP4 graphics

This is the chip used in a number of Chromebooks including the Asus Chromebook Flip C101PA, Samsung Chromebook Plus, and Acer Chromebook Tab 10.

It’s also used in the much more recent PineBook Pro, a laptop designed to run free and open source GNU/Linux-based software.

Firefly’s little computer features LPDDR4 dual-channel memory, support for 802.11n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.2, and Gigabit Ethernet.

It also has HDMI 2.0a and USB 3.0 Type-C ports allowing you to connect up to two displays, USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 Type-A ports, and 3.5mm audio jack, and an IR receiver for use with a remote control (which comes with the computer, along with an external antenna, HDMI cable, and power supply).

The whole thing measures 4.9″ x 3.1″ x 1.25″ (124.4mm x 79mm x 31.6mm), making it an almost pocket-sized device.

via LinuxGizmos and Firefly

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  1. 32 gig on it’s own is not enough for win 10 anymore – I got two 32 Gig compute sticks I cant make current anymore because not enough room to update to latest win 10, even if I restore the factory image and then delete that partition to get more for windows.

    So probably no point buying the 32gig if you want win 10.

    Side point: Both the intel compute sticks I have are deliberately setup with BIOS to not allow a linux install or boot from USB, so pretty annoyed with intel and M$. Later compute sticks changed this policy, but these two not much use for anything.

    There is probably a workaround somehow, but the relative cost of this or replacement hardware vs my time does not support it. Once in this territory I have learned that cheap is often very expensive because value is zero for something you cant use, regardless of price.

    1. bradlinder – Brad Linder is editor of the mobile tech blog Liliputing, an independent journalist and podcast producer and editor based in Philadelphia.
      Brad Linder says:

      These aren’t designed to run Windows.

        1. bradlinder – Brad Linder is editor of the mobile tech blog Liliputing, an independent journalist and podcast producer and editor based in Philadelphia.
          Brad Linder says:

          Nope. Maybe you we’re thinking of one of the recent posts on other mini PCs with Intel Celeron chips and windows support? Let me know if you’d like me to delete these comments.

    1. bradlinder – Brad Linder is editor of the mobile tech blog Liliputing, an independent journalist and podcast producer and editor based in Philadelphia.
      Brad Linder says:

      Also a good point. I’ll update the article to reflect that.