The new Asus E210 laptop is a 2.3 pound notebook with an 11.6 inch display, an Intel Pentium Silver N5000 processor, and support for up to 8GB of DDR4-2400 memory and up to 512GB of storage.

It’s the smallest of three new budget laptops unveiled by Asus recently, but even the larger models are designed to be thin, light, and versatile devices — the 14 inch Asus E410 notebook weighs just 2.9 pounds, while the 15.6 inch Asus E510 is a 3 pound laptop (there’s no individual page for this model at Asus website yet).

It looks like Asus will offer models with 4GB or 8GB of RAM and a choice of 64GB/128GB of eMMC storage or up to a 512GB PCIe Gen3 x2 SSD.

Both the E210 and E410 feature support for WiFi 5 and have ports that include:

  • 1 x USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-C
  • 1 x USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • 1 x USB 2.0 Type-A
  • 1 x HDMI
  • 1 x 3.5mm audio
  • 1 x microSD

But the screen size isn’t the only difference between these laptops.

The 11.6 inch Asus E210 has a 38 Wh battery, a body that measures 11″ x 7.5″ x x 0.7″ and it’s only available with a 1366 x 768 pixel display.

The 14 inch Asus E410 has a 42 Wh battery, a body that measures 12.8″ x 8.5″ x 0.7″ and is available with up to a 1920 x 1080 pixel display. This model also supports an optional backlit keyboard.

Details for the 15.6 inch Asus E510 should be available closer to launch.

According to the press release, all of the laptops should have 180-degree hinges, a 6-inch Asus NumberPads (allowing you to use the touchpad to enter numbers), and three color/design options: Peacock Blue, Dreamy White, and Rose Gold.”

Asus is positioning the laptops as student-friendly notebooks that should offer all-day battery life. But with 6 watt, 4-core/4-thread Intel Pentium Silver N5000 processors, don’t expect these laptops to be speed machines. The good news is that I also wouldn’t expect them to be very expensive.

Asus E210MA

Asus E410MA

 

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  1. @Brad Linder said: “Asus is positioning the laptops as student-friendly notebooks… The good news is that I also wouldn’t expect them to be very expensive.” Wrong… 11.6 inch fully functional cheap laptops used to be a thing like what – 10 years ago? Yeah, they were called “Netbooks” and they had processors and memory that were good enough to be useful and real HDD’s that you could easily upgrade. But all the laptop manufacturers got BURNED by the netbook fad because everyone stopped buying their hugely over-priced bloated mainstream 14″, 15.6″, and 17″ behemoth laptops, and bought netbooks instead. So the solution was to KILL OFF the little useful netbooks by crippling them with too little non-upgradeable memory and tiny non-upgradeable eMMC storage. But a precious few 11.6″ netbook form-factor laptops DID survive, specifically to target the bloated and inefficient “Taxpayer Funded Public Education” market. Yup, these little 11.6″ machines are essentially the SAME as the “netbooks” you used to buy for $200-$300, but now only “Schools” can easily buy them, and now they cost 200%-400% more! Here is a current case in-point: Dell Latitude 11 model 31901, 11.6″ anti-glare non-touch Laptop for Students | Pentium N5030 8GB SDRAM 256GB M.2 SSD | $689 MSRP, ~$600-$650 street price IF you can buy it in the first place. https://www.dell.com/en-us/work/shop/dell-laptops-and-notebooks/latitude-3190-laptop/spd/latitude-11-3190-laptop/bto003l319011us So DO NOT expect this new 11.6″ ASUS “Education” laptop to be “very inexpensive” as you put it – by any means! In-fact I’ll bet the ASUS 11.6″/N5000/4GB/512GB version to run $500-$600 street price – but as an individual you will never be able to really buy one. However, if you wait a few years you may be able to pick one up as a refurb that “leaked” out of the corrupt “system”, but it still won’t be “inexpensive”.

    1. 1. The netbook label was pretty much exclusively applied to systems with 10.1 inch or smaller displays.
      2. As far as I’m aware, Asus has very little market share in the education space, at least in the United States.There’s a difference between “student-friendly” and sold to the education market. This is a consumer device that they’re positioning as good for students.
      3. With that in mind, and based on the model numbers, I suspect these laptops will basically fall into the same category as current models like this Asus VivoBook L203MA 11.6 inch laptop, which sells for $270: https://www.amazon.com/ASUS-Ultra-Thin-Processor-L203MA-DS04-Microsoft/dp/B07N6S4SY1/
      4. Prices will probably be a *little* higher, since the new models have better processors, more storage, and new features like the Asus Number Pad.

      1. Hi Brad…

        1. “The netbook label was pretty much exclusively applied to systems with 10.1 inch or smaller displays.”

        You are right. If I remember correctly for a long while the displays were limited to 10.1″ and 1024×600 pixels and the processor had to be an Intel Atom or similar. I don’t remember who put those limitation out, Microsoft, Intel, or both. However towards the end of the “Netbook Era” some of these specifications were either loosened or manufacturers started ignoring them somehow, and that’s when the 11.6″ 1024×768 (later 1366×768) screens showed up. Regardless of the screen size, I think the “Netbook Era” really died with the Atom processors.

        2. “As far as I’m aware, Asus has very little market share in the education space, at least in the United States.There’s a difference between “student-friendly” and sold to the education market. This is a consumer device that they’re positioning as good for students.”

        I agree. That’s why I’m thinking ASUS is to try and break into the “education market” as you put it (institutional school systems). I think the 11.6″ ASUS E210 laptop is aimed squarely at the over-priced 11.6″ Dell Inspiron 11 3XXX series of laptops that are so popular with school systems. I doubt ASUS will sell the 11.6″ E210’s direct to consumers, they would erode the market for their larger more expensive machines. I sent ASUS an EMail asking where and when can I buy some E210MA laptops, what is the MSRP, and what if any restrictions there are on purchasing. I’ll post back here if they reply.

        3. “With that in mind, and based on the model numbers, I suspect these laptops will basically fall into the same category as current models like this Asus VivoBook L203MA 11.6 inch laptop, which sells for $270.”

        I’m going to differ with you on this one. The cheap Vivobooks are crippled with tiny non upgradaeble storage (max 32/64GB eMMC), max 2GB/4GB SDRAM (at 4GB barely enough), and they usually come with Windows 10S only (yeah it’s easy to upgrade it to Win10 Home). The ASUS E210 series 11.6″ laptops come with up to 256GB SSD, 4GB/8GB SDRAM, and a full blown Win 10 install. Institutional buyers like school systems will not settle for 64GB maximum storage, they know it’s not enough for anything but the most basic of applications, and a slow and prone-to-fail uSD card won’t cut it either. School systems will buy the E210 laptops with larger SSD’s. That’s the pattern I see with the expensive Dell Inspiron 11 series 11.6″ laptops.

        4. “Prices will probably be a *little* higher, since the new models have better processors, more storage, and new features like the Asus Number Pad.”

        I hope you are right. But I split with you on this one in my original comment. Again, I think ASUS is trying to break into the institutional buyer market, school systems in-particular. School systems waste money like there’s no tomorrow – in the U.S. anyway. I think the E210 series is going to be expensive, just like the over-priced Dell Inspiron 11 laptops, which target U.S. school systems. Time will tell… I’ll be happy to lose this argument.

        Take Care,

        David in Florida

  2. Here is the most important specification about this little laptop, the screen is ANTI-GLARE and NON-TOUCH – Yay! Specifically: “11.6” (16:9) LED-backlit HD (1366×768) 60Hz Anti-Glare Panel”.

    1. @Steve Said: “No full size keyboard on the E210. For some reason.” Wrong… Go here and read about the product before making such a sweeping presumptive statement: https://www.asus.com/Laptops/ASUS-Laptop-E210MA/ You will NEVER get a usable (by humans anyway) “full-sized” keyboard layout on an 11.6 inch laptop. The standard keyboard has keys with 1.4mm of travel, which is quite generous compared with the competition IMO. Then there is what ASUS calls a “full-size backlit keyboard with long key travel” option. But mind-you once again, the layout will never be truly “full-sized” on such a small machine. Here are the words on the optional keyboard verbatim from the product’s web page (link above): “…optional full-size backlit keyboard with long key travel ensures comfortable and accurate keystrokes, and a large 6-inch multitouch pad with palm-rejection technology offers smooth and accurate cursor control.”

      1. @Drone

        Asus for some reason don’t put full *height* keys on their 11.6″ laptops. None of them. I can see from the product pictures they didn’t put full height keys on this one either. Whatever their product page says.

        The 11.6″ MacBook Air back then used the exact same full size keyboard as its bigger 13.3″ brother. Or sister. Quite a usable one.

        Most 11.6″ Chromebooks have full size keyboards. Interestingly Asus’ Chromebook as well. They only put the shrunken height keyboard onto their small Windows notebooks. For some reason.

        See for example: https://image-us.samsung.com/SamsungUS/home/computing/chromebooks/pdp/xe310xba-k03us/gallery/Gallery-CB4-11in-2-092519.jpg

        Narrower trackpad (similar design as on the 11.6″ MacBook Air) leaves room for full height keys. Easy as that.