Apple’s MacBook Pro laptops come in two sizes — and half a year after updating the larger model, its time for a 13 inch MacBook Pro refresh. Contrary to recent rumors, the new model has the same screen size as its predecessor. But the 2020 MacBook Pro 13 inch laptop is getting a bunch of other upgrades.

Among other things, it supports up to 10th-gen Intel Ice Lake processor options (with up to an 80-percent boost in graphics performance), twice as much storage as previous-gen models, and support for up to 3733 MHz RAM onsome models. There’s also a new keyboard that should be more reliable.

The new 13 inch MacBook Pro is available from Apple for $1299 and up.

While processor and RAM spec bumps should bring better performance, the move away from Apple’s much-maligned “butterfly” keyboard should make the new MacBook Pro easier to actually use. At this point it looks like Apple is ready to acknowledge that its butterfly experiment failed — the company no longer sells any new laptops featuring butterfly keyboards.

It’s also worth noting that the keyboard and storage upgrades are the only real changes if you opt for an entry-level model. You’ll have to pay $1799 or more if you want a configuration with an Intel Ice Lake processor and LPDDR4X-3733 memory. Lower-priced configurations come with 8th-gen Intel Core processors and LPDDR3-2133 memory.

Apple notes that models with 8th-gen chips can support video output to a single 5K (5120 x 2880 pixel) display with a 60 Hz refresh rate, while models with 10th-gen chips can support up to a single 6K (6016 x 3384) display. Both can drive up to two 4K displays at 60 Hz.

All models of the new MacBook Pro feature a 13.3 inch, 2560 x 1600 pixel display with 500-nits of brightness and 227 pixels-per-inch, Touch Bars and Touch ID fingerprint readers above the keyboard, two Thunderbolt 3 ports. WiFi 5, Bluetooth 5.0, and a 720p webcam.

Here’s a run-down of starting prices/configurations for the new MacBook Pro 13:

  • 8th-gen Core i5/8GB/256GB for $1299
  • 8th-gen Core i5/8GB/512GB for $1499
  • 10th-gen Core i5/16GB/512GB for $1799
  • 10th-gen Core i5/16GB/1TB for $1999

Apple offers optional Core i7 upgrades for each model, and the 8th-gen configurations support up to 2TB of storage and 16GB of RAM, while the 10th-gen Core variations top out at 4TB of storage and 32GB of RAM.

press release

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  1. They fixed the keyboard, thermals, and screen issues they’ve been having since the 2015-2020 “Jony Ive” variants. Good.

    Although I thought they would also include the latest Intel on all the Macbook “PRO” models. Guess it means that production and availability of those chipsets are still low. This is perfect for Apple, as it means their upcoming 2021 MacBook Pro’s can catch up to the 2020 models. That is if, the rumours of them using an in-house custom variant of A14 chipset are true.