Samsung’s Galaxy Z Flip foldable smartphone has garnered a lot of headlines in recent weeks. But odds are the company will sell a lot more Samsung Galaxy S20 series phones in the coming months. While the Flip is a niche device aimed at folks looking to pay a premium price for a modern take on the classic flip phone, the Galaxy S20 is Samsung’s first true flagship of 2020.

The follow-up to last year’s Galaxy S10, the Samsung Galaxy S20 is an upgrade in just about every way. Faster processor?Check. 5G support? It comes standard. Camera upgrades. Yup.

And folks willing to pay a bit more for the highest-priced models can also pick up a Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra, the first smartphone available with up to 16GB of RAM… whether you really need it or not.

All told, there will be three versions of the phone:

  • 6.2 inch Samsung Galaxy S20
  • 6.7 inch Samsung Galaxy S20+
  • 6.9 inch Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

Each phone has a 3200 x 1440 pixel AMOLED display with a refresh rate of up to 120 Hz, a Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 processor or Samsung Exynos 990 chip, depending on the region, and multi-camera setups with support for 8K video recording.

But the larger phones have better cameras and bigger batteries.

Here are some key specs for each model:

Samsung Galaxy S20

  • Up to 12GB of LPDDR5 RAM (or 8GB with the 4G model)
  • 128GB + microSD card slot
  • 4,000 mAh battery
  • 25W fast charging
  • 10MP front camera
  • 12MP primary camera
  • 12MP ultra-wide camera
  • 64MP telephoto camera (3X)

Samsung Galaxy S20+

  • Up to 12GB of LPDDR5 RAM
  • 4,500 mAh battery
  • Up to 512GB + microSD card slot
  • 25W fast charging
  • 10MP front camera
  • 12MP primary camera
  • 12MP ultra-wide camera
  • 64MP telephoto camera (3X)

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra

  • Up to 16GB of LPDDR5 RAM
  • Up to 512GB of storage + microSD card slot
  • 5,000 mAh battery
  • 45W fast charging
  • 40MP front camera
  • 108MP primary camera
  • 12MP ultra-wide camera
  • 48MP telephoto camera (10X)

Samsung says the Galaxy S20 series smartphones will be available starting March 6th, 2020.

Prices start at $1000 for the Samsung Galaxy S20, $1200 for the Galaxy S20+ and $1400 for the Galaxy S20 Ultra.

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  1. Display size: 6.2″ to 6.9″ …!!
    How can I call it a mobile phone unless it fits my pocket!

    I think the game is over for mobile phone market for Samsung, unless I’m a South Korean citizen.

    Also I think, for 8K/UHD2 video recording a 10″ display is the minimum requirement.

    Let us see what is in store in future. 🙂

  2. Wow, I don’t do much on my phone so I’m wondering what people do that would need that much RAM on a phone. My notebook has 8 GB of RAM and the most RAM heavy use case I have is running 1-2 VMs simultaneously.

    1. It is necessary for boasting about how much RAM your phone has. Alternatively, if you are catastrophically disorganised you could have about 200 tabs open in your browser of choice.

      1. Android tends to lend itself to catastrophic disorganization. When you switch apps or press the home button, you don’t really close anything, it all just stays open in the background forever (eating up ram) until you close it manually.
        I’ve also read that android likes to keep as much stuff in RAM as is possible. Feel is very important to sales and satisfaction (just not necessarily YOUR sale and satisfaction). By keeping everything in RAM, the movement of UI elements follows the fingers more closely, and when there’s 16 billion bytes of it, people can download all the garbage megacorp adware/spyware/bloatware apps they want on every stupid impulse (maximizing the phone’s performance on its true purpose: being a billboard) and it’ll still feel responsive.

  3. You know it makes no difference to me if a phone has 8GB of RAM or 16, if it has 3 cameras or 7, if it has a 0.5mm bezel or 2mm bezel. But I want that goddamned headphone jack, and so help me I will not buy a phone without one, even if I have to wait another 5 years for it, and my old S8 will be held together by ducttape and WD40, I refuse to give a penny to Samsung until they keep up with this idiocy.

    1. A friend of mine still sports his Note 4 because it has a replaceable battery. I even introduced him to iFixit so he could fix the glass lense cover to get the camera working again.

    2. If Red Green was still on TV, he would certainly have an episode for how to fix cell phones with duct tape and WD40.

      I’m also going to hang onto my S9+ for quite a while. I’m not buying flagship phones anymore. Canadian phone providers are just thieves. They charge launch MSRP prices for phones until the day they discontinue them. I have an S9+ and S8+ both with cracked screen glass. I’m going to order a few replacements for each, and see how long I can use these devices.

      I’m with you on the headphone jack. Bluetooth is nice, but their convenience only exists in normal circumstances. I won’t ever travel with bluetooth headphones. Its just too inconvenient to plan my time around charging several devices.

      1. A major German retailer (read: as reputable a seller as you can get) currently sells the S10+ for 650 euros and that prices includes 19% VAT. You guys on the other side of the pond are ripped off when it comes to phones. (And not only. And mostly not only.)

        @Brad, the phones’ resolutions are of course 1440 pixels wide, not 1400.

        1. You can pick up an S10+ “renewed” (as new) from Amazon with 3 month’s warranty for $500 right now. S9 models can be had for well under $300. There’s no real reason to pay more than $300 for a flagship specced smartphone these days. There just isn’t enough difference to be worth the extra price unless you’re a slave to the absolute cutting edge specs.

          1. @Tacitus I’m glad more and more people are becoming reasonable these days. There is little change between generations of the flagship phones, and yet the prices are set-up extremely high. For the same amount of money ($1400) you can buy both new laptop and 2-generations old flagship. And both the laptop and the phone will be probably more than enough anyone could wish for.