Last year Mozilla launched an experimental browser add-on called Firefox Private Network that could encrypt your session and route your data through a proxy server to hide your location from websites and data trackers.

But unlike a traditional VPN, the service only affected one app — the Firefox web browser.

Now Mozilla is beginning to roll out apps that will apply the VPN service to all data from your device. Android Police spotted a Firefox Private Network VPN app in the Google Play Store, which works system-wide.

There’s a catch or two though:

  • Firefox VPN for Android is still an early access/beta app.
  • You’ll need to request an invite to sign up for the service.
  • The VPN ain’t free — a subscription runs $4.99 per month (while in beta).

Mozilla says Windows 10, Android, and Chromebook apps are in beta right now, with iOS, Mac, and Linux apps “coming soon.”

Firefox VPN uses the new WireGuard protocol, which is designed to be faster than other standards such as IPsec and OpenVPN, while also being simpler to use. And Mozilla has partnered with VPN provider Mullvad on the branded service, partially because unlike some VPNs, Mullvad has an emphasis on privacy (the company does not save user data logs).

Don’t want to pay for a VPN? The Firefox Private Network browser extension is still free to use for up to 12 hours per month.

 



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6 Comments

  1. I signed up for the $4.99 USD VPN to test it on Windows. However, I use a Linux distro more frequently. I contacted their support about their Linux plans. Their response was that Linux support is likely really far off if at all.

    That last part was unfortunate, I plan on canceling my subscription.

    1. Same. Mozilla told me Linux support isn’t actually on their roadmap at all. Maybe a wishlist/maybe item at best. Too bad but I guess not getting a few subscribers vs. going for a a larger addressable market makes sense.

    2. Whaaaat. I signed up for their FPN VPN since I’d like to support Mozilla in some way outside of making random Google searches (I use DuckDuckGo for real searches). However, I’m more a Linux user and was hoping “coming soon” was actually true.

      I’ll ask their support as well. If they say that Linux support isn’t really a real thing in their roadmap, then I’m going to cancel.

  2. I’m using the FPN VPN on Windows 10 right now. The application sometimes crashes when opening it from the system tray icon or when closing the window. Connecting and switching between servers takes a few seconds which is much faster than other VPNs I’ve used that use OpenVPN. No idea how secure Wireguard is but it’s not considered stable nor recommended by its creators yet so both FPN VPN and Wireguard are in beta.

    Too bad about their no real plan on supporting Linux. If that’s true, then I’ll be canceling next month. I was just testing on Windows because that’s what they currently support.

  3. Too bad about the lack of linux support. I use linux and Firefox and like to support Mozilla when possible.

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