Lenovo launched the ThinkBook line of laptops aimed at small business customers earlier this year. Now the company is adding two new models.

The Lenovo ThinkBook 14 is coming in November for $649 and up, while the Lenovo ThinkBook 15 will be available around the same time for a starting price of $679.

Both laptops are available with up to a 10th-gen Intel Core i7 processor, up to 24GB of DDR4 memory, and up to 2TB of storage (with options for dual storage thanks to an M.2 PCIe slot and a 2.5 inch drive bay.

Lenovo also offers AMD graphics options for both models.

The ThinkBook family of laptops lack some of the features found on the company’s ThinkPad line, such as the TrackPoint system. And while both of these laptops feature USB Type-C ports, neither has Thunderbolt 3 support.

But did I mention that prices start at $649?

Anywhere, here are some key specs for each model:

Lenovo ThinkBook 14

  • Up to a 14 inch, FHD IPS display
  • Up to a 10th-gen Intel Core i7 processor
  • Optional AMD Radeon 625 graphics
  • Up to 24GB of DDR memory
  • Dual storage option (SSD or Intel Optane memory + HDD)
  • 45 Wh and 57 Wh batteryoptions
  • 2 x USB Type C ports (USB 3.1 Gen 2 + USB 3.1 Gen 1)
  • 3 x USB Type-A ports (two USB 3.1 + one USB 2.0)
  • HDMI
  • SD card
  • Ethernet
  • SD card
  • 12.8″ x 9.1″ x 0.7″
  • 3.3 pounds

Lenovo ThinkBook 15

  • Up to a 15 inch, FHD IPS display
  • Up to a 10th-gen Intel Core i7 processor
  • Optional AMD Radeon 620 graphics
  • Up to 24GB of DDR memory
  • Dual storage option (SSD or Intel Optane memory + HDD)
  • 45 Wh and 57 Wh batteryoptions
  • 2 x USB Type C ports (USB 3.1 Gen 2 + USB 3.1 Gen 1)
  • 3 x USB Type-A ports (two USB 3.1 + one USB 2.0)
  • HDMI
  • SD card
  • Ethernet
  • SD card
  • 14.3″ x 9.7″ x 0.7″
  • 3.7 pounds

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6 replies on “Lenovo introduces ThinkBook 14 and 15 budget business laptops”

  1. Both the 14 and the 15 models have 1080p displays, I assume. So the 15 model won’t show you more information, just the same information slightly bigger. Who are 15 notebooks these days for? You must be really old or must have really bad vision to opt for the 15 model. My parents are still perfectly fine with their laptops with a 14″ screen.

    Of course, this is a question for the whole notebook industry, but I have to ask it somewhere.

    1. Edited to add. According to my logic 15″ notebooks must be a very small market these days the majority being sold must be the 14″ models across all manufacturers.

      1. Lenovo still defaults to 1366×768 on some of its Thinkpads. If you hate yourself, you can go to lenovo.com and get a T490 with a dim (220 nit) 1366×768 screen. The horrible screens are a great way for people in corporate purchasing to save $70 on a $1400 purchase by taking a great computer and making it miserable to use.

    2. “Who are 15 notebooks these days for? You must be really old or must have really bad vision to opt for the 15 model.”

      Never underestimate the number of people with really bad vision! (Says the person who’s worn glasses since he was 9.)

      On a 14″ 1080p screen Windows will default to 150% scaling. At 15″ it defaults to 125% scaling. So that’s more information on the screen using the Windows 10 defaults.

      And to turn it around, if portability isn’t a main concern then why get a 14″ model instead of 15″? Streaming video is bigger on the 15″ screen, letting you sink a little deeper into the couch. If you’re a developer then you’re likely using an IDE with way too much information on it, so every extra inch is important.

      Finally, a 15″ laptop will generally be larger that a 14″ one. More space inside might mean an extra drive slot, or a larger battery, or maybe better thermals because the parts aren’t crammed so close together.

      (Sent from my 14″ Dell Latitude.)

      1. “Never underestimate the number of people with really bad vision! (Says the person who’s worn glasses since he was 9.)”

        No, I didn’t. But realistically what percentage of the population we are talking about? Who would opt for a 15 laptop over a 14 (a laptop is supposed to be a portable computer for most) for their vision alone?

        “On a 14″ 1080p screen Windows will default to 150% scaling. At 15″ it defaults to 125% scaling. So that’s more information on the screen using the Windows 10 defaults.”

        An important point! Speaking of the 14″ screen, 1080p scaled at 150% is 720 pixels vertically. That’s unusably low. That gives you less horizontal pixels than your typical 768×1366 (that comes in the 11.6″ these days). Speaking of the 15″ screen, 1080p scaled at 125% gives you 1 virtual pixel for every 1.25 physical pixel. That looks like crap. Doesn’t it? Usable fractional HiDPI scaling starts at 150%. At least that’s the minimum an Apple laptop or a Microsoft device uses – and I assume these two companies care a bit more about the user experience than most other PC manufacturers who opted for the 1080p screens across the board simply to cut costs. But Apple and Microsoft laptops (if we consider the the Surface Pro a laptop for our purposes) are not the cheapest ones and to add insult to injury, Microsoft’s aren’t available internationally and are fully and completely unrepairable. I mean you can’t even get the battery replaced in them, even by a service center.

        “If you’re a developer then you’re likely using an IDE with way too much information on it, so every extra inch is important.”

        My above point applies to this one as well.

        “Finally, a 15″ laptop will generally be larger that a 14″ one. More space inside might mean an extra drive slot, or a larger battery, or maybe better thermals because the parts aren’t crammed so close together.”

        Maybe. But as the example of the above ThinkBook 14 and 15 suggests these are exactly the same machines only their screens differing in size and it is the more common industry practice.

        Is the PC industry doomed? Some say yeah, it has been for quite a few years.

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