Acer is introducing a bunch of new Chromebooks with screen sizes ranging from 11.6 inches to 15.6 inches and prices starting as low as $250.

Announced at the IFA show in Berlin this morning, all four should be available in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa starting in October before heading to North America in December.

All of the new Chromebooks feature fanless designs, two USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type-C ports that can be used for charging and data, two USB 3.1 Type-A ports, HD webcams, and microSD card readers.

They all support 802.11ac WiFi and Bluetooth 5.0, and they’ll all be available with a choice of Intel Celeron N4000 dual-core or Intel Celeron N4100 quad-core processors, while the largest model (the Chromebook 315) is also available with up to an Intel Pentium Silver N5000 quad-core chip.

Here’s a run-down of the new Chromebooks.

Acer Chromebook 311 (CB311-9H/9HT)

The smallest, cheapest model features an 11.6 inch display and a starting price of $250.

It weighs about 2.3 pounds, supports up to 4GB of RAM and 32GB of eMMC storage, and features an HD IPS display.

Acer Chromebook Spin 311 (CP311-2H)

With a starting price of $330, this is actually the most expensive of the new models. But it’s also the only one with a 360-degree hinge that allows you to turn the laptop into a tablet by pushing the screen all the way back.

The little convertible laptop weighs about 2.6 pounds and features a Corning Gorilla Glass cover for its touchscreen display.

Acer will offer models with up to 8GB of RAM and 64GB of storage.

Acer Chromebook 314 (CB314-1H/1HT)

Available with a choice of a 14 inch touch or non-touch display, the new Chromebook 314 will be available with up to a 1080p IPS display.

Prices start at $280, and this model will also support up to 8GB of RAM and 64GB of storage.

Acer Chromebook 315 (CB315-3H/3HT)

The only member of the lineup with a numeric keypad, the 15.6 inch model also supports up to a 1920 x 1080 pixel IPS display.

It’s also the only model to support up to 128GB of eMMC storage.

Prices start at $280.



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  1. Is there any significant difference between the N4100 quad-core Celeron and the N5000 quad-core Pentium? According to the specs and benchmarks, not much.

    The Acer Chromebook 311 at 2.3 sounds nice. I’m looking for a simple, small and light computer in this category. Should it be my next Chromebook? Does Acer make good Chromebooks regarding the quality of the screen, the keyboard, and the touchpad? The three most important aspects to consider. Otherwise all 11.6″ models are the all same across all brands.

    1. The 5000 looks to be about 10% better performance-wise across the board. Better, but incrementally so.

      We get a lot of Acers for our clients, and they fit the bill. Quality is good, and they’re tough enough to withstand the abuse schoolkids give them, for the most part. The components are good. They’re top tier in terms of cheap Chromebooks. I have been considering getting an Acer for a while now for travel. I adore the R11 and would love something like that.