Apple has unveiled a new Independent Repair Provider Program that could make it easier to find a place to get a broken iPhone fixed.

The company says third-party electronics repair shops that want to provide service for out-of-warranty iPhone repairs can apply to become a member of the program, which allows them to purchase components, receive training, service guides, and diagnostic tools from Apple.

While Apple is calling this a new program, it’s actually more like an offshoot of the company’s Apple Authorized Service Provider Program, albeit an offshoot that lowers the barriers for entry… and seems to be restricted to iPhone repairs at the moment.

iPhone XS teardown (iFxit)

The good news is that Apple has fewer requirements for membership in the new program, and it will be cheaper for participants to take their certification tests. That means we’re likely to see a much larger number of officially sanctioned independent repair shops using genuine Apple parts rather than third-party components.

But one big difference between the two programs seems to be that while the AASP program covers “any Apple product” including iPads, Macs, and other devices, the IIRP program only mentions iPhones.

So while it may be easier to find an iPhone repair shop using high-quality components soon, you may still need to look a bit harder to find a place for out-of-warranty MacBook repairs.

press release

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5 replies on “Apple expands support for third-party iPhone repair shops”

  1. Apple Sez:

    There is no cost to join Apple’s independent repair program. To qualify for the new program, businesses need to have an Apple-certified technician who can perform the repairs. The process for certification is simple and free of charge. To learn more and apply, visit support.apple.com/irp-program. Qualifying repair businesses will receive Apple-genuine parts, tools, training, repair manuals and diagnostics at the same cost as AASPs.

    Seems pretty reasonable to me.

    1. Not really, more like bad news.
      “See we’re trying to work with the little man, and be consumer-friendly”.

      Meanwhile they want to charge people for membership and course, and take monopoly over parts distribution. That causes bottlenecks. Samsung is as popular as Apple, and they do not have such BS program, and they get along fine, with many happy customers.

      In short, this is still about control and is taking options away from consumers and driving prices higher, just to line Apple’s pocket.

      1. Rossmann welcomes the decision as a step in the right direction, but doubts it’ll be anything he’ll be able to take advantage of because the vast majority of his repairs are component level replacements and Apple likely will not be supplying items like IC chip replacements.

        Even with the parts they will provide, price is key. If Apple charges $50 more for replacement screens than perfectly functional knockoffs, again, most customers will go with the more affordable option.

      2. What membership charges do you talk about? Joining the repair program and training is free for qualifying businesses.

        Who could make genuine Apple parts if not Apple (Apple’s suppliers)? I don’t quite understand your logic. Louis neither:

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