The company that makes black and white screen technology for devices like eReaders has been expanding into new markets in recent years including digital signage and writing slates.

Now E Ink wants in on… tinted windows?

Basically the new E Ink JustTint film allows clear panes of glass to turn opaque or semi-opaque.

The company describes JustTint as a “variable transmission light control film” that can quickly adjust the level of tint in sunroof, skylight, or window.

Like other E Ink displays technologies, JustTint is bi-stable. That means it only draws power when you’re adjusting the opacity. No power is used to keep the screen clear, dark, or somewhere in between.

This technology probably won’t show up in Amazon’s next Kindle. But it is interesting to see E Ink move into new territories.

The company is showing off the new technology and SID Display Week, and the animated GIF below should give you an idea of what it looks like in action.

 



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11 replies on “E Ink’s JustTint tech allows clear windows to turn opaque”

  1. Adafruit sells something similar to this: https://www.adafruit.com/product/3330 $7.50 is dirt cheap by adafruit standards so I wonder what it would cost to get it in a larger size. The adafruit one just has tint and black though. no in between, so Im not sure if its the same tech.

  2. I hope this can be adapted for glasses. Photoreactive lenses are great under certain conditions, but they are useless in cars and most types of vehicles now thanks to UV blocking glass. I’d love a set of lenses that could be adjusted instantly to the perfect level of tint, even if it meant having to charge them every now and then.

  3. If it really is variable from clear to fully black, this could be an alternative to blinds.

  4. Definitely a better solution than current tech which requires a charge to maintain opacity.

  5. 3M had a solution like this years ago, but IIRC it required power to remain tinted.

    This would be cool for car windshields, and side windows. It would be nice if you could hit a button, and cause the upper 10% of the window to have a 100% tint.

    1. What about those photochromic glasses that automatically tint without any power? Could that technology work in car windows?

  6. Combine this with one of those transparent OLED displays, and finally we can have a TV that doesn’t look like a big black rectangle 90% of the time!

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