Last week AMD unveiled a new set of Ryzen Mobile laptop chips designed for the enterprise market. Now it’s Intel’s turn.

The chip maker’s new Intel Core i5-8365U and Core i7-8665U chips are 15 watt Whiskey Lake processors that support Intel vPro technology and which run at higher frequencies than their non-vPro counterparts.

In a nutshell that means they should offer slightly better all-around performance, and a bunch of security features that aren’t available in the company’s consumer chips.

For example, the chips support Intel’s new “Hardware Shield” technology which helps protect against firmware attacks, Intel’s Active Management technology for remote management and maintenance, and Intel’s Threat Detection technology.

The new chips also supports WiFi 6 (802.11ax) support.

Intel says companies including Dell, HP, Lenovo, Panasonic and other PC makers will launch products using the new processors in the coming months.

Since the security and manageability features are the key selling points for these chips, I’d expect to see them in business-class computers first. But the small speed boost could also make these chips a little more attractive than Intel’s latest non-vPro laptop chips. Here’s an overview of the differences:

  • Intel Core i7-8665U with vPro – 1.9 GHz base / 4.8 GHz turbo
  • Intel Core i7-8565U – 1.8 GHz base / 4.6 GHz turbo
  • Intel Core i5-8365U with vPro – 1.6 GHz base / 4.1 GHz turbo
  • Intel Core i5-8265U – 1.6 GHz base / 3.9 GHz turbo

All of the chips are 14nm processors with four CPU cores, eight threads, support for up to 32GB of DDR4-2400 RAM, and Intel UHD 629 graphics featuring a base frequency of 300 MHz. The Core i5 variants have max GPU frequencies of 1.1 GHz, while the Core i7 chips top out at 1.15 GHz.

You can see more of the similarities and differences at Intel’s website.

 

 

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal