A growing number of companies seem to be launching E Ink tablets with support for pen input. Sony, Onyx, and ReMarkable currently offer one or more models. Last month MobiScribe introduced a new 6.8 inch model. And now it looks like a new option is the way the EeWrite E-Pad tablet.

The folks at Gadget Labs say this 10.3 inch tablet with a capacitive touch display and a Wacom pen, Android software, and 4G LTE support will go up for pre-order through a Kickstarter campaign starting March 26th.

It’s expected to have a retail price of $699, but the first 200 folks to back the Kickstarter campaign will be able to reserve one for $399.

The retail price makes this one of the more expensive 10.3 inch E Ink slates around — Sony’s Digital Paper and the ReMarkable tablet both sell for about $600, while the Onyx Boox Note is $499 and the Boox Note Plus sells for $559. But neither of those models has a SIM card slot with support for 4G LTE. And the promotional $399 price is a pretty good deal if you’re cool with pre-ordering.

Here’s a run-down of the E-Pad’s key specs:

  • 10.3 inch, 1872 x 1404 E Ink display (227 ppi)
  • Deca-core processor
  • 2GB of RAM
  • 32GB of storage + microSD card slot
  • Capacitive touch + Wacom pen input (72ms latency)
  • Mic and speaker
  • WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, and 4G LTE
  • Android operating system (with Google Play Store)
  • 392 grams (14 ounces)

You can sign up at the oGadget website by the end of the day (February 27th) to get a first crack at one of the 200 discounted units.

We’re expecting to get a chance to check out the E-Pad in the coming weeks and will hopefully be able to share some thoughts before the crowdfunding campaign goes live next month.

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8 replies on “E-Pad is a 10.3 inch E Ink Android tablet with a Wacom Pen, 4G support (crowdfunding)”

  1. The author Brad Linder said he hoped to be able to try an E-Pad and write about before the KickStarter campaign. Have not yet seen his hands-on article.

  2. I should be excited about this, but I’m not. There is a lack of quality Android apps that support an active stylus. Squid and Google Notes are about all there is. (OneNote is serviceable but not that great)

    This (lack of quality stylus support) is the only weak spot in my otherwise enjoyable experiences with the Pixelbook and Google Pen. The Pixelbook does everything and more than the iPad Pro did for me but the support for the Pen pales in comparison to the support for the Apple Pencil on the iPad Pro.

  3. I wish they would use more transparent means to get these to market. Kickstarter and Indiegogo are a scummy way to get around basic consumer protections. I have a 50% track record with both sites of getting a product after I make the contribution. I’ve received all the “small” rewards but a few of the larger ones have failed to materialized somehow. And the persons running them are no where to be found and with NO recourse to recover any my money from either company.

  4. I wish the price of larger e-ink displays would come down. I love the power sipping capability of these bigger devices. I also keep waiting for color E-ink displays. I know the color will never be vibrant and I really don’t care. I want the ability to pack a bunch of books, magazines and manuals into a single 10″ screen device that has color even if it is washed out looking. I am not going to be editing photos or watching videos on a e-ink device anyway.

    1. I wish so too, but no matter how many of these e ink tablets are proposed, they are not as sexy as multi-camera and folding smartphones and don’t have the mass-appeal. So they will probably remain niche.

    2. I completely agree with you. Unfortunately, I really don’t expect the price of the displays to come down significantly any time soon. Onyx and Likebook are good companies but I don’t think they have the economy of scale to drive down the component costs nearly as much as Amazon can. Amazon shut down Liquavista last year, so they’re not even actively trying to create color e-ink displays anymore.

      Because B&N seems to care less and less about the Nook and the Kobo partnership with Walmart hasn’t taken off, Amazon doesn’t have a competitive reason to release a major new Kindle product. They released the Kindle (and later the Fire) to get people to buy ebooks and other digital media from their store. Until those sales are threatened by a legitimate competitor, Amazon won’t act.

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