Motorola’s Moto G series smartphones have a track record of offering decent specs at reasonable prices… they’re not the sort of phones that are going to satisfy mobile gamers or photography enthusiasts, but they’re not bad if you’re looking for a cheap, reliable phone.

The company is holding an event in Brazil on February 7th, where Motorola is expected to unveil the Moto G7 lineup. But pictures of the upcoming phones leaked a few days ago, and now CNET has a run-down of the features for four upcoming Moto G7 series smartphones.

Apparently Motorola Brazil posted detailed specs on its website a few weeks early and only pulled down the web pages after CNET requested comment.

The flagship phone is the Moto G7, which sports a 6.24 inch, 2270 x 1080 pixel display (with a small notch around the front-facing camera), a Qualcomm Snapdragon 632 processor, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of storage, a 3,000 mAh battery, a 12MP rear camera and an 8MP front-acing camera.

It supports 4G LTE, 802.11ac WiFi, and Bluetooth 5.

There’s a fingerprint read on the back of the phone, support for face unlock, a USB Type-C port, a headphone jack and microSD card reader.

Motorola also has a souped-up model called the Moto G7 Plus. It has the same basic design, but sports a Snapdragon 636 processor and a 16MP front camera.

The Moto G7 Power, meanwhile, has a 6.2 inch, 1520 x 720 pixel display, a Snapdragon 632 processor, 3GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, a 12MP rear camera, and an 8MP front camera. It has a fingerprint reader but no support for face unlock. And this cheaper model only supports 802.11n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.2.

Wondering where “power” comes into it? This phone has a 5,000 mAh battery, which should offer substantially longer battery life than you get from the other phones in this series.

Motorola’s Moto G7 Play seems like it will probably be the cheapest phone in the new lineup. It has a 5.7 inch, 1512 x 720 pixel display, a Snapdragon 632 processor, 2GB of RAM, and 32GB of storage.

The entry-level model has a 13MP rear camera and 8MP front-facing camera and it’s powered by a 3,000 mAh battery (which will likely last a bit longer in this phone than in models with larger displays).

Like the Moto G7 Power, the G7 Play tops out at 802.11n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.2 and lacks face recognition support.

While it seems extremely likely that Motorola will officially launch all four of these phones at its February 7th event in Brazil, it’s unclear whether all four models will be available internationally. The company has a habit of only offering certain models in certain regions.

via xda-developers

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

14 replies on “Motorola’s Moto G7 smartphone lineup leaked (by Motorola)”

  1. I’m glad to see Motorola move away from the SD450 from their last G-series iteration.

    1. I don’t exactly comprehend this hanging tight for 5G thing however. The US hasn’t begun wide-scale sending of the foundation and it’s a wreck on the gadget side. 5G modems are mind boggling, doesn’t downsize great, hot, and control chugging. It’s sufficiently awful that Qualcomm doesn’t offer it coordinated into their snapdragon line yet.

      Truly, there’s no reason for updating telephones at this phase of the amusement in case you’re content with what you have. In any case, if your telephone is over 3 years of age, you might need to have an arrangement or strategy for sudden equipment disappointment.

      1. I don’t exactly comprehend this hanging tight for 5G thing however. The US hasn’t begun wide-scale sending of the foundation and it’s a wreck on the gadget side. 5G modems are mind boggling, doesn’t downsize great, hot, and control chugging. It’s sufficiently awful that Qualcomm doesn’t offer it coordinated into their snapdragon line yet.

        Truly, there’s no reason for updating telephones at this phase of the amusement in case you’re content with what you have. In any case, if your telephone is over 3 years of age, you might need to have an arrangement or strategy for sudden equipment disappointment.

  2. Motorola was never great with updates but since Lenovo took over they have become near bottom of the list. Couple that with the level of crapware usually installed and it makes it hard to recommend Motorola phones to family or friends looking for a modest phone. It is a shame because the hardware is pretty good for the price.

    1. Really? My wife and I both have different Moto phones and the updates are fine–at least the security updates. They come every 3 months or so, and the wife’s was updated to 9.0 last month. The only one I’ve had that was better was LG.

      But that said, I don’t like too timely of updates. I’ve had issues with my Nexus tablet’s updates.

    2. What crapware? Apart from the standard Google apps (required for inclusion of Play Store) and the “Moto” app (which I find useful anyway), I don’t recall anything else that stood out when I got my Moto G5.

      Admittedly, my phone will never run anything beyond Oreo but I was pleasantly surprised to have a security update arrive a couple of days ago.

    3. Maybe you should take a look at their Android One offerings? I just picked up an X4 through Google last month and I like it. No bloatware, android updates directly from Google. I believe the G6 is offered in an Android One version and fully expect the G7 to as well

  3. I don’t see a compelling reason to buy new (absent existing phone having issues) until: (1) Qualcomm Snapdragon moves to 7 or at least 11nm to gain better power efficiency; and (2) 5G. And that’s good. The technology as matured to the point where you can go four generations without upgrading.

    1. Or your phone suddenly dies. You may have a while to wait on your 2 requirements. I hear 7 series is expensive and niche. Expensive enough that Qualcomm may not continue that line past 2020.

      I don’t quite understand this waiting for 5G thing though. The US hasn’t even started wide-scale deployment of the infrastructure and it’s a mess on the device-side. 5G modems are complex, doesn’t scale down very well, hot, and power-guzzling. It’s bad enough that Qualcomm doesn’t even offer it integrated into their snapdragon line yet.

      Honestly, there’s no point in upgrading phones at this stage of the game if you’re happy with what you’ve got. However, if your phone is more than 3 years old, you may want to have a plan or course of action for sudden hardware failure.

    2. What if your phone is already four years old?

      The 636 can go toe-to-toe with the still recent flagship 821 (in the likes of the Pixel XL) in plenty of benchmarks, so it’s more than fast enough for all but the most demanding tasks, like VR or gaming, and can no doubt go all day on a charge with typical usage.

      5G phones aren’t going to be hitting the Moto market segment for another couple years at least, but if you’re looking at $250 phones, then you’re not really in the market for 5G anyway, so it’s a moot point.

  4. Most likely won’t be offered in the US, as US phones will
    be featuring 5G, unless Moto decides to put 5G into
    its 2020 phones.

    1. These are entry-level to mid-range phone. Nobody’s coming out with 5G phones in these market segments this year, and I doubt the Motorola line will have 5G next year either. Pretty pointless until there’s a decent sized network to use them on.

Comments are closed.