Asus is announcing four new Chrome OS devices ahead of the Consumer Electronics Show. One is the company’s first Chrome OS tablet. The other three are notebooks.

The Asus C403 Chromebook is a rather boring looking 14 inch model with an Intel Apollo Lake processor, while the 11.6 inch Asus C204 and C214 are updates to last year’s C202 notebook and C213 convertible, respectively. These new models both sport current-gen Intel “Gemini Lake” processors.

All four new models should be available in the coming months, and all three are designed for the education market, which explains their ruggedized designs.

Here’s a run-down of some key specs for each of the laptops:

Asus C214 Chromebook (convertible)

  • 11.6 inch, 1366 x 768 pixel, 250 nit touchscreen display w/360-degree hinge and Gorilla Glass 3
  • Wacom EMR pen support
  • Intel Celeron N4000 and N4100 processor options
  • Up to 8GB of RAM
  • Up to 64GB of EMMC 5.1 storage
  • 5MP or 8MP rear camera and 720p front-facing camera
  • 2 x USB 3.1 Type-C ports
  • 1 USB 3.1 Type-A port
  • microSD card slot
  • Headset jack
  • 45 Wh battery
  • 11.5″ x 7.8″ 0.8″
  • 2.6 pounds

Asus C204 Chromebook (laptop)

  • 11.6 inch, 1366 x 768 pixel, 220 nit, non-touch display
  • Wacom EMR pen support
  • Intel Celeron N4000 processor
  • Up to 4GB of RAM
  • Up to 32GB of EMMC 5.1 storage
  • 720p front-facing camera
  • 2 x USB 3.1 Type-C ports
  • 2 x USB 3.1 Type-A ports
  • microSD card slot
  • Headset jack
  • 50 Wh battery
  • 11.5″ x 7.8″ 0.8″
  • 2.6 pounds

Asus C403 Chromebook (laptop)

  • 14 inch, 1366 x 768 pixel, 220 nit display
  • Wacom EMR pen support
  • Intel Celeron N3350 processor
  • Up to 4GB of RAM
  • Up to 32GB of EMMC 5.1 storage
  • HD front-facing camera
  • 2 x USB 3.1 Type-C ports
  • 2 x USB 3.1 Type-A ports
  • microSD card slot
  • Headset jack
  • 45 Wh battery
  • 13.5″ x 9.2″ x 0.8″
  • 3.7 pounds

All three models feature 802.11ac WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 and they all feature LPDDR4-2400 memory.

press release

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11 replies on “Asus introduces 3 new Chromebooks for students”

  1. Is there a Windows S variant of these ASUS Chromebooks? With a normal keyboard (not only two keys on the bottom left side next to space) a fully functional BIOS so that I can install Linux on it, preferably without having to pay for a Windows tax. None of these have IPS displays?

    1. I agree. Installing Seabios on a Chromebook is functional, but using Windows S allows for a Linux install with no bios changes.

      1. I’m not sure what do you agree to. I didn’t make a statement, I’ve asked questions. Two of them. 🙂 OK, speaking of SeaBIOS, I don’t know much about it, but does it work similarly to Android custom ROMs in a sense that, say these new laptops come out, then about a year later they will either be supporter by SeaBIOS or not? I couldn’t really find a good, generic write-up on this.

        1. There is a 99% chance that SeaBIOS will install without any issues on all of the above chromebooks. Once installed you can install your linux distro of choice with a bootable usb drive. No need for Windows S version… but the downside is that a traditional bios is much easier to use and has many more options. I was agreeing with your choice to use a Windows S version over the chromebook version… for the goal of installing linux.

          1. Thanks for the tip! I also have beef with that all Chromebooks (except Google’s Pixelbook and Pixel Slate) have only two keys bottom left to the space bar. While Google’s Pixelbook and Pixel Slate have three. Because… Who understand’s Google?

  2. I promise that if you elect me Worldwide Grand Overseer of Technology, I make it a crime to produce 1366 x 768 screens. That is all. Thank you.

    1. So what resolutions do you recommend for screens 11.6″ in size like 2 of these 3 laptops, what operating systems and respective app ecosystems not only support, but also look good with said resolution? I may have trouble if I want to go Linux with your machine, especially if I have preferences when it come to the desktop environment.

  3. The Asus 202SA has the best keyboard I’ve ever seen on a cheap Chromebook, with a solid deck and reasonable travel and feel. It’s not a Thinkpad, but Thinkpads don’t debut with a $219 list price. It’s also pretty light and very robustly built, and would make for a very good machine for typing,

    The press release says the 204 has keys with 1.5mm travel, so hopefully Asus has kept the good keyboard. The Celeron N4000 is a big step up from the N3060 in the old model, but that’s mostly irrelevant if you’re using the machine mainly as a typing platform.

  4. I really hope the processor on the 14-inch is a mistake… the N3350 is a 3 year old low end processor, and is significantly worse than the N4000 that is listed for the other two laptops. That, or it costs like $150 per unit.

  5. HP owns my school district’s chromebook contract. It will be very difficult for Asus to make inroads.

Comments are closed.