HP’s business laptop lineup is getting a new member. The HP ProBook x360 440 G1 features a 14 inch, 1080p touchscreen display, a 360-degree hinge, optional pen support, and a reasonably compact design: the laptop measures 0.8 inches thick and weighs 3.8 pounds.

It features business-friendly features including security tools and services and commercial support and serviceability. The laptop is also MIL-STD 810G tested.

The ProBook x360 440 is also relatively affordable: prices start at $599.

That said, you’ll probably pay considerably more if you want a model with top-tier specs.

HP says the system supports up to an Intel Core i7-8550U processor, up to 16GB of DDR4-21333 RAM, up to 512GB of PCIe NVMe solid state storage, and optional NVIDIA GeForce MX130 graphics.

But it’s also available with Celeron 3865)U, Pentium Gold 4415U, Core i3-8130U, Core i5-7200U, and Core i5-8250U processor options and as little as 128GB of M.2 SATA SSD storage.

In additional to optional pen and discrete graphics, the notebook supports an optional Windows Hello-compatible IR camera for facial recognition and/or an optional fingerprint reader.

It also has two USB 3.0 ports, a USB 3.1 Type-A port, a headset jack, HDMI 1.4, Gigabit Ethernet, and an SD card reader. The HP ProBook x360 440 is powered by a 48 Wh battery.

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2 replies on “HP launches ProBook x360 440 for $599 and up”

  1. It seems ok! But for tablet use 3.8 pounds is too heavy.
    2.5 pounds max, or just use it in tent mode!

  2. No matter how many times I see it, I’ll never get used to it: a 2-in-1, presumably… to be used in portrait mode too but sporting a thinner and very un-document friendly aspect ratio (16:9).

    I’m convinced you can replace virtually any CEO today in tech with a regular tech reader (on this site, for example) and come up with more common sense decisions. Tech CEOs are useless conformists.

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