There are plenty of ways to use a Raspberry Pi to learn to code, whether you buy a kid-friendly Kano Computing Kit or just download free software (like Kano’s, for example), that includes simple games, tutorials, and interactive apps for learning to code.

But the new CrowPi presents another solution… one that’s not just aimed at teaching kids to program, but which also teaches a bit about electronics and hardware hacking.

It’s up for pre-order through a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign, with early bird pledge leveels starting at $149. The CrowPi is expected to ship in July.

The CrowPi kit is powered by a Raspberry Pi (which can be bought with the kit or separately), but it adds a 7 inch touchscreen display, a breadboard, and a bunch of extra peripherals including LED displays, buzzers, motors, and a control keypad so that you can learn to write code that makes things light up, move, or perform other actions.

You could also use the CrowPi as a laptop or desktop computer… albeit a rather funny looking one. But all you need to do is attach a mouse, keyboard and battery to use it on the go (it can be powered by an external battery pack), or connect an external display to use it at home.

There’s also support for add-ons such as webcams.

CrowPi supports beginner-level coding tools such as Scratch and more complex tools including the Python programming language.

via CNX-Software

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8 replies on “CrowPi is a Raspberry Pi-based computer science education kit (crowdfunding)”

  1. You know, an idea that would have been more in keeping with the low cost of the Raspberry Pi would have been a similar setup, but replace the touch screen display with a cradle to secure an old tablet/smartphone most families probably have kicking around these days.

    Then all you need to do is install the app developed for the kit, hook up the USB cable, and you’re off.

  2. I have a 9 year old that thinks he’s interested in this stuff. Is this something a 9 year old would be able to deal with? Or can someone suggest something better for a young kid?

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