Israeli PC maker Compulab specializes in small, fanless computers like the Fitlet2 and the Mintbox Mini Pro.

For the most part fanless means low power. But a few years ago the company shook things up with the launch of the Airtop, a high-power fanless PC that could dissipate up to 200 watts, allowing Compulab to stuff the guts of a workstation or gaming desktop into a small, fanless chassis.

Now Compulab is getting ready to launch a new model. It’s called the Airtop2 and it will be available with an upgraded CPU, GPU, memory, and storage. It’s still fanless and the company calls it a 0dB gaming PC.

The Airtop2 will go up for pre-order through a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign starting February 24th. And while Compulab hasn’t revealed the price yet, expect this to be a very expensive PC.

Prices for a first-gen Airtop start at $795 for a model that’s pretty much just a barebones case, power supply, and wireless module. Once you add a processor, graphics card, memory, storage, and OS prices range from around $1500 to $3900.

The new model supports an Intel Core i7-7700K processor, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 graphics, up to 64GB of DDR4-2400 RAM, and has room for up to two NVMe solid state drives and up to four 2.5 inch hard drives or SSDs.

Other features include a ridiculous number of ports including dual Ethernet jacks, multiple DisplayPort and HDMI ports, mic and line out jacks, 2 USB 3.1 ports, and 7 USB 3.0 ports.

The new model looks a bit thicker than the original Airtop thanks to the larger cooling air-tubes on the sides of the PC, but they should provide the extra cooling power needed to keep those high-power Intel and NVIDIA parts from overheating.

Update: If you don’t want to go through the hassle of a crowdfunding campaign and you’re willing to settle for a system with just a Core i7-7700 processor, you can get the Airtop 2 for $1335 and up from Fit-IOT.com.

This non-Inferno model looks more like its predecessor, but it only supports up to an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 or Quadro P4000 graphics card.

The starting price includes a processor, but you’ll have to pay extra for storage, RAM (up to 64GB), discrete graphics, or other options.

via Hexus and FanlessTech

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12 replies on “Compulab Airtop2 Inferno is a compact, fanless gaming PC (crowdfunding)”

  1. Everthing Compulab sells is so over-priced. It makes me wonder if the “crowdfunding” is really just a “self-funding” publicity stunt.

  2. airtop2 and inferno are different computers, something not exactly clear in the article. airtop2 is configurable now for sale, inferno is launching with kickstarter soon.

    1. Seems like there is really no difference (GPU aside). Not sure why they did not go with a i7-8700? Probably an issue with their special motherboard.

  3. Actually Compulab specializes in small industrial computers. Looks like Compulab is stepping into the gaming computers territory which is rather new for them.

  4. Cool. Too bad it’ll be way too expensive. I wouldn’t have thought the first one would have sold well but I guess it did since there’s a 2nd version.

  5. It’s a very interesting concept, however, when that GTX 1080 goes above 85c, it will throttle.

    The only real way to eliminate throttling is to have both the CPU & GPUs water-cooled.

    The new Zotac Magnus EN1080K and the pending Digital Storm Spark’s SFFs seem the way to go.

  6. “Inferno” for a fanless gaming rig with an unlocked i7 and a GTX 1080. Very apt name, but it seems kind of counter intuitive marketing wise – most gamers who overclock try pretty hard to avoid having an inferno. That said, it’s a very cool concept, just wish it was a little more reasonably priced.

  7. I really like the concept… a custom motherboard, case and power supply. That’s it. Off the shelf CPU, SSD and graphics card.

    1. Custom motherboards suck too, cause you can’t upgrade the CPU whenever Intel switches chipsets for a new processor – which happens a lot.

      That’s usually just an attempt to lock you in…

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