Zotac’s 2018 line of ZBOX mini PCs range from low-end models with Intel’s low-power Gemini Lake processors to new high-end PCs with workstation-class NVIDIA Quadro graphics.

There are also new fanless models with improved heat dissipation and support for 8th-gen Intel quad-core processors.

The company says its new fanless system has a redesigned chassis that allows it to support up to a 25 watt TDP. That’s a good thing, because while Intel says its Kaby Lake-R chips are 15 watt processors, they can be configured to run hotter than that to squeeze out some extra performance.

Zotac says its new Gemini Lake systems are designed to take advantage of new features in Intel’s latest Celeron and Pentium chips including native support for HDMI 2.0.

We don’t have detailed specs for these new mini desktops yet, but Zotac will be showing them off at CES next week and I plan to stop by the company’s suite to check them out in person.

Zotac is also launching a new Magnus gaming mini PC with an 8th-gen Intel 6-core processor and an updated version of the Zotac VR Go backpack with NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 graphics.

 

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6 replies on “Zotac introduces 2018 ZBOX Mini PC lineup ahead of CES”

  1. I always liked the looks of the Zotac mini PC’s. I never bought one because their prices are higher than everybody else.

  2. Somebody please clue me in…all of these current and upcoming systems have Intel CPUs that are affected by the Meltdown bug, is that right?

    30% performance loss is not something that can be ignored. Are benchmarks being revised to reflect this new reality for Intel CPUs? (I understand AMDs are also affected to a lesser extent.)

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