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It’s getting tougher and tougher to find laptops with replaceable batteries. Meanwhile, it’s getting easier to find portable battery packs that you can use to charge your phone, tablet, or other gear on the go.

Unfortunately, most of those portable battery packs won’t charge a laptops, but there are some powerful models with USB Type-C ports that can charge some newer laptops. And then there are models like the RAVPower 20,100 mAh/65W battery pack with an AC plug as well as USB ports. You can basically plug your laptop adapter right into the battery pack to charge on the go.

In fact, you can plug just about anything in… as long as it doesn’t require more than 65 watts. No big-screen TVs or microwave ovens need apply.

Battery packs with AC plugs have been around for a while, but the RAVPower model is currently on sale for $80, which is one of the best prices I’ve seen for a device in this category.

Here are some of the day’s best deals.

Portable batteries

Bluetooth speakers

Bluetooth headphones

Media streamers

Computers and computer stuff

You can find more bargains in our daily deals section.

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6 replies on “Deals of the Day (12-06-2017)”

  1. Interesting hadn’t thought about it that way. perhaps in the future laptops should have some lower capacity very durable super quick charge cell, and then the user can also lug around a separate cell that uses whatever technology they choose to handle longer term power requirements.

  2. Out of curiosity, what are the efficiency losses stepping the voltage up to 110 and then back down? Also, I wonder if there are speed differences?

    1. There should be losses in both the inverter (battery to 115) and the laptop adapter (115 to (likely) 19vdc) – appearing as heat in both. But not significant in the grand scheme of things. Inverter losses elsewhere (such as in a hybrid car) are significant and often require liquid cooling systems.

      I can’t see why there would be any speed differences – if the laptop adapter works at 115V and 65 watts it will work the same plugged into the inverter as it would plugged into a wall socket.

      1. Thanks!

        As to the speed difference, I was thinking between this and something that just connected via some form of USB.

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