Lenovo has been offering tiny desktop computers for a while, but the company’s new ThinkStation P320 Tiny is the first to feature discrete graphics.

The computer measures 7.2″ x 7.1″ x 1.4″ and supports up to a 35 watt Intel Core i7-7700T Kaby Lake processor. It also features NVIDIA Quadro P600 graphics.

Prices start at $799.

Lenovo says the ThinkStation P320 Tiny weighs about 2.9 pounds, but offers performance that’s good enough for use in education, financial trading, or even product design and architecture applications. The company refers to the computer as the “world’s smallest workstation,” which might be pushing the definition of a workstation PC a bit… but I suppose it depends on what you consider “work.”

Anyway, the system supports up to 2TB of M.2 NVMe solid state storage, up to 32GB of DDR4-2400 RAM, and has two storage slots and two SODIMM slots for memory.

Ports include six USB 3.0 ports, an Ethernet jack, and mic and headset jacks. There are two full-sized DisplayPort ports and four more mini DisplayPort connectors. If you need additional connectors, there are also add-ons that can give you more USB ports, serial ports, and other features such as an optical disc drive.

The system supports Windows 7, Windows 10, and Linux and other optional accessories including an under-desk mount and a VESA mount (for connecting the PC to the back of a monitor).

 

 

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2 replies on “Lenovo ThinkStation P320 Tiny is a mini PC with discrete graphics”

  1. Windows 7 on a Kabby Lake CPU? Wait, did Microsoft and Intel lie to us? (BTW they did, Win7 runs just fine on KL, just the iGPU needs a beta intel driver)

  2. Discrete graphics so small, it’s discreet…
    I do like these small Lenovo boxes. This one is a little expensive for education, but I have deployed a few of them at schools for specialized applications. They work great, and I can see using some of these for high school CAD classes and the like.

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