As expected, AMD has a new high-power desktop processor on the way, and it’s a beast. The AMD Ryzen Threadripper chip is a 16-core processor with support for 32-threads.

It’s set to launch this summer.

Based on the same “Zen” architecture as the company’s recently released Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 chips, the new processor is expected to be branded under the Ryzen 9 name, with a top-of-the-line model featuring 16 CPU cores with base clock speeds of 3.5 GHz and boost speeds up to 3.9 GHz.

Zen chips are also multiplier unlocked, which means that there’s nothing stopping you from attempting to overclock the computer.

If there’s a down side, it’s that the upcoming Threadripper is expected to be a power-hungry 155 watt processor, but that’s hardly unexpected for a high-end desktop-class processor.

One thing to keep in mind is that not all of the things you do on a PC are optimized to take advantage of 16-core/32-thread chips, so depending on what you’re using a PC for, the real-world performance boost may not be all that noticeable over 12-core chips… or even quad-core processors.

AMD also plans to launch lower-power (and lower-performance) Ryzen 3 chips this summer, and the first Ryzen chips for mobile devices are also set to launch in the second half of 2017.

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

4 replies on “AMD Ryzen Threadripper 16-core desktop CPU coming this summer”

  1. These ryzen chips are more power efficent than intel. An 8 core desktop ryzen CPU uses just as much power as a quad core kaby lake, and the performance is on another level.

    Undervolted and downclocked, these ryzens are absolute monsters. Mobile parts coming later this year will be very interesting.

    1. Are you sure?

      I was under the impression that Intel still leads RyZen in terms of power drain, thermal leakage, and absolute performance when comparing like-for-like. It’s just that Intel’s products are much more expensive than AMD. And they’re also severely limited in comparison to AMD, who’s providing more and more cores, threads, and overclock-ability.

      Things should reverse in 1.5 years when Ryzen V2.0 comes out with better optimisations, and built on the 10nm fabrication. Intel will stick with its +14nm FinFet at that time, and should be at the disadvantage for a year… they will concede defeat to AMD but return with 7nm fab chips the year after.

  2. Can’t wait to have programs modified to take advantage of all these cores.

    1. You don’t run VMs, write your own parallelized code, or even multitask? You don’t do *any* of those things? Well, that’s fine, but maybe a processor with better single core performance is a better fit for you.

Comments are closed.