AMD’s first chips based on the company’s new Zen architecture are all designed for desktop computers. But if you’ve been wondering when the new chip technology would make its way to notebooks and convertible tablets, AMD has an answer: in the second half of 2017.

More importantly, the company has revealed a little bit of what to expect from the upcoming Ryzen Mobile APUs.

Codenamed Raven Ridge, the new chips are quad-core processors which the company says should offer a 50 percent performance boost over previous AMD mobile chips.

They also feature AMD’s new Vega graphics technology, for a 40-percent boost in GPU performance. But the company says it’s also reduced power consumption by 50 percent, which should also lead to longer battery life in mobile devices.

AMD says its Ryzen Mobile chips are designed for portable computers including “premium 2-in-1s, ultraportables, and gaming form factors.”

I wouldn’t be surprised to see Gigabyte, Zotac, or other small form-factor desktop PC makers also cram a Ryzen Mobile chip into an Intel NUC-sized computer, since a low-power processor with integrated graphics might be a better choice for those devices than a model that requires a discrete graphics solution.

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

5 replies on “AMD Ryzen Mobile chips (Raven Ridge) coming later this year”

  1. I too would be interested to see a Ryzen competitor to Intel’s Core M3, Core M7, Core i5-U, and Core i7-HQ chipsets.

    Not sure how they would scale. All the evidence points to Intel still having the more efficient design, on-top Intel is using their class-leading 14+nm FinFet lithography. I think a better optimised Ryzen v2.0 on 10nm fab would be advanced enough to defeat the current Intel’s Core M7 chips in efficiency.

    1. They are already deadly efficient. 3.5-4.0 GHz is the ceiling on the gen 1 ryzen chips and they already have wicked perf/watt. Downclock them to ~3 GHz or so and reduce the voltages to match and suddenly you have a sub 40w 8 core monster that smashes anything on the market. The mobile parts will be killer, but shoving ryzen into 2-4w is asking for a little too much I think.

      I doubt they will scale so low.

    2. Definitely interested if AMD releases versions that target the same market as the “high end” Atom or low end Core m3 chips.

Comments are closed.