Acer’s been offering mini desktop computers under the Revo name for a number of years, but the new Acer Revo Cube RN76 is one of the first that could be easily mistaken for an Intel NUC (or Gigabyte BRIX).

It’s a little PC-in-a-box that measures 4.6″ x 4.4″ x 2.2″ and which weighs about 2.6 pounds.

The computer supports Core i3, Core i5, and Core i7 Kaby Lake processor options, up to 32GB of DDR4-2133 RAM, and features an M.2 slot for solid state storage and a 2.5 inch bay for a hard drive or SSD.

The model Acer is showing off at its new product showcase also seems to have a Qi-compatible wireless charging plate on top, suggesting that at least some models may be able to charge your phone or other gadgets when you place them on top.

Acer hasn’t announced a price or release date for the Revo Cube yet.

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6 replies on “Acer’s latest tiny desktop is the Revo Cube”

  1. With an i3, i5 or i7 any mainline Linux distro (Ubuntu, Mint, Red Hat, etc) should run as well as Windows 10. If it were an AMD processor I would hedge my bets as IME some of their CPUs with integrated graphics don’t run well on Linux but the 64 bit CPUs from Intel with integrated graphics usually run fine. I should note that it won’t be running anything without RAM and a HDD or SSD, many of these NUC computers don’t come with RAM or HDD/SSD and you have to add them before it will run anything.

  2. The NUC has serious cooling and fan noise issues. I wonder how Acer addressed these.

    1. Any modern OS should be supported. Some of them, though, may lack some drivers.

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