Toshiba’s new 10 inch Windows tablet with an Intel Cherry Trail processor and a detachable keyboard dock is now available for purchase.

You can pick up a Toshiba Satellite Click 10 with 32GB of storage for $350. Add an extra $20 to the price if you want a model with 64GB.

toshiba satellite click 10

Both models feature Intel Atom x5-Z8300 processors, 2GB of RAM, and 10.1 inch, 1920 x 1200 pixel displays.

The Satellite Click 10 tablet features 802.11a/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.1, and a 22.5 Whr battery. There’s an 8MP camera on the back of the tablet, with auto-focus support, and a 2MP fixed-focus, front-facing camera, along with dual microphones for use with Cortana, voice or video calling, or other functions.

The tablet ships with Windows 10 and support Microsoft’s Continuum software which lets you automatically transition from a tablet user interface to a notebook UI when you attach the keyboard dock.

Speaking of the keyboard dock, in addition to QWERTY keys, it features a touchpad and two USB 2.0 ports. The tablet itself has a micro HDMI port, a USB 2.0 port, and a memory card reader.

Toshiba first unveiled the Satellite Click 10 in July, although for a while it looked like it would be called the Encore 10 in the United States.

via Toshiba

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10 replies on “Toshiba Satellite Click 2-in-1 now available for $350 and up”

  1. It’s almost 2016, put an active digitizer on that thing already! Much more important than the back camera

  2. Beware of a lot of these devices that do not have an IPS screen if you have any plans on using it as a tablet… Even as regular laptop having a good quality screen is a must unless you wish to be adjusting the screen all the time to compensate for narrow viewing angles.

    1. Unfortunately, the x5-Z8300 can only be configured with 2GB of RAM… Would need the x5-Z8500 to support up to 4GB of RAM… So this is a bit overpriced as well for what you get, but I guess they justify it with the FHD display, which is still not standard for the budget range…

      But I’d just add they should also double the storage, many of the competition are now offering up to 128GB…

      1. For what I do 32 GB + cloud storage is fine (at least on my chromebook, I don’t know how much storage Windows needs in comparison)

        1. … A lot more, though, Windows 10 is leaner than Windows 8 and at max it’s possible to shove the whole installation down into a 10GB partition but the actual space used is flexible as the amount of compression used varies according to your set up and how well the OEM optimizes it…

          But most OEMs don’t optimize the install to maximum and thus 32GB often leaves you with barely over 10GB free, but you’d have to watch out for updates eating that up over time, along with temp files that don’t get auto deleted, etc. Also, keep in mind it’s usually recommended to keep a SSD half empty for peak performance and longevity…

          While desktop apps can take multiple GB’s, depending on what you run but generally you’d need more space than web apps… Thus, for people who don’t want to constantly maintain their drive space it’s usually recommended to get a 64GB or larger…

          There are some, being called Cloudbooks by Acer, that rely on cloud storage to offset the difference, along with max compression to justify 16GB drives, to push for even cheaper devices that compete directly with Chromebooks… but it’s not recommended for everyone unless they really want a cheap Windows laptop… as the lack of reliability and high maintenance means it’s usually better to just get a Chromebook, if you’re going to compromise that much…

          Mind, it’s not as easy to configure OneDrive to not use up drive space when syncing… It can be done but it’s a lot simpler on Chromebooks to maximize the benefits of a cloud drive…

          Though, there are some caveats… namely, one of the features Windows 10 will offer later, hopefully in the next big update, is the option to install Windows apps onto a SD card… Right now you can only do so with desktop apps that allow for custom install options and 128GB cards should become common by next year, along with faster speeds to make them more useful… but once that feature is enabled then space would be less of a issue for most…

          1. Even with windows 8 and office, my T100 had 11gb free; windows 10 seems to reduce the space taken up by around 7gb.

            Windows 8 onwards now cleans up updates after 30 days, so that’s far less of an issue.

          2. It’s less of a issue but until there are more universal apps it remains that legacy desktop apps still can take up a lot of space and most people are rather messy with how well they maintain their system and that can wind up eating up the free space rather quickly…

            Besides, it’s bad enough we’ll have to wait until next year’s Broxton before the faster eMMC 5.0 specification is supported. So the least they can do is provide more storage and it’s about time they stop using storage space to justify leveraging profit margins… It doesn’t take $30-$50-$100 to double storage capacity for a ~$8-$16 difference in chip cost for the BOM…

            This is a holdover from the mobile market, which these ATOM based systems are using the same parts from to reach certain price points… but a PC product has different priorities and these type of pricing policies are holding what they could offer back…

            Like, even Bay Trail supported 4GB of RAM for most of their tablet SoCs but we rarely see that offered… Cherry Trail doubled the max support to 8GB but we’re only seeing up to 4GB offered even for the higher priced Surface 3…

            There are other reasons involved, like most OEMs are waiting on LP-DDR4 to replace LP-DDR3, but it’s just one factor that they should really change already…

            Btw, the main reason why you get the extra 7GB is because they essentially did away for the need for a recovery partition. When you reset it just keeps the existing Windows files and that also means you don’t need to re-download all the OS updates but also means you may have a greater need for a separate backup in case the OS files get corrupted or you otherwise need to restore the whole drive…

    1. The Airmont architecture is pretty much the same as Silvermont, they mainly focused on GPU performance improvement this time around.

      So, expect only a marginal CPU performance increase for the equivalent clocked Bay Trail SoC but 50% to 2x improvement on GPU performance…

      Though, watch the reviews carefully as it seems some Cherry Trail models have issues with over heating that the Bay Trail’s didn’t… Especially when gaming and seems the GPU is generating more heat and if they didn’t update the heatsink to deal with it then the device can suffer from throttling issues… but so far I’ve only seen it reported on cheap Chinese tablets but the Surface 3 did have a issue with a rather intensive GPU benchmark that caused it to shutdown to protect itself from the over heating but that should be less of a issue on the lower end Cherry Trails, as the Surface 3 is running on the top end x7-8700… but the Chinese tablets were running on the x5-8500, so still watch out…

      However, some of this may be just a issue with the first batch of SoCs shipped… 14nm is a new process and Intel had some delay issues and that usually means the first batch isn’t fully optimized yet…

      Bay Trail had a similar issue and later released SoCs were able to be clocked higher as they improved the FAB yields… Such as the Z3775 that basically replaced the Z3740…

      While most new models should be pushing 64bit this time around and they should be finally phasing out the 32bit UEFI and we may see some better results on the SD card readers as well but otherwise it’s a minor update to the ATOM…

      The actual big update is next year with Broxton, the Goldmont architecture will be a full update to both the CPU (up to 2x) and GPU (up to 3x)… but till then you may want to check out the upcoming Skylake Core M based products if you’re looking for better performance and they’re getting cheaper than the earlier Core M products…

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