Google may be positioning Chrome OS as a platform that’s suitable for video conferencing systems (if you pay $1000 or more for the right hardware). But that hasn’t stopped Grandstream from launching its own video conferencing system that runs Google’s other operating system.

The Grandstream GVC3200 video conferencing system is a high-end conferencing solution that runs Android 4.4 software, allowing you to use Android apps such as Skype, Hangouts, or any other video conferencing apps available from Google Play.

grandstream

If you’re looking for a simpler solution for one-on-one internet video chats, just use your phone or laptop’s built-in mic and camera. The Grandstream GVC3200 is designed to be a business conferencing solution: it features a 1080p video camera with 12x zoom, support for up to three monitors through 3 HDMI ports, and support for 9-way video conferencing.

There are also HDMI and VGA inputs that let you hook up your computer to share your screen with other participants, gigabit Ethernet and 802.11 a/b/g/n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, and a Bluetooth remote with a touchpad and Android buttons.

You can use a Bluetooth mouse, speaker, or other peripherals, and there’s an Android app that lets you use a phone or tablet as a remote control for the system.

The GVC3200 won’t come cheap though: Stores are taking pre-orders for about $4000 and up.

via FCC

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

One reply on “Grandstream GVC3200 is an Android-based video conferencing system”

  1. I’d like to wireless stream eye-fi SD cards from my SLR or micro 4/3rds camera to my pc and then upload that via sip. Only problem is bandwidth is often assymetrical. And upload needs to be more than 20mbps for high quality avhcd which is the default codec. Plus I doubt sip uses avhcd codec. If Olympus or Panasonic used an sip friendly codec, people could have their own tvstations. The gh4 has an adapter for uncompressed HDMI but it would be a while before that kind of bandwidth would be readily uploadable to the internet in real time. All eye-fi needs is a way to upload class 10 or faster before the file is finished, either by dual writing mode or some other codec that the camera developer could make by working with the SD card engineer.

Comments are closed.