SwiftKey offers a third-party keyboard app for mobile devices which is designed to save you time by, among other things, predicting the next word you’ll want to type before you’ve even finished entering the current word.

Now SwiftKey has a new Android app called Clarity. It’s also a keyboard app, but instead of focusing on predictions, Clarity emphasizes corrections: it can automatically correct multiple words at once.

clarity

Clarity is an experimental app that comes from the new SwiftKey Greenhouse project. It may not have all the features you expect from a SwiftKey keyboard, but it has a few features you probably won’t find in other keyboards either.

Among other things, Clarity learns phrases, slang, and nicknames that you use regularly so it won’t automatically “correct” text that you don’t think is misspelled. You can also quickly capitalize letters by dragging your finger from the shift key to a letter or switch to symbols by dragging from the 123/abc key.

Think it’s been overzealous in correcting words that you’ve already typed? Hit the backspace key and it’ll undo corrections.

SwiftKey is making Clarity available as a free download from the Play Store. You can install it, give it a try, and share feedback with the developers. Eventually this could help Clarity become a better keyboard… or help SwiftKey incorporate some of Clarity’s features into its flagship keyboard apps.

 

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One reply on “SwiftKey Clarity Android keyboard features multi-word autocorrect”

  1. Hmmm interesting. I’m a heavy SwiftKey user on iOS, and it already does a lot of the stuff mentioned in the article. For example, it remembers slang, commonly typed e-mail addresses, acronyms, etc. It also does pretty well with multi-word corrections. I’d love to see some *clarification* on what this does differently than the current keyboard.

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